Vision Technical Keeps Its Eyes on the Mold

Author: 
Bob Michaels
MD&M East 2010 First-Time Exhibitor Coverage
Vision Technical specializes in laparoscopic stapling device components, dosage-metering devices, and other medical device applications.

Since day one, Vision Technical Molding (Manchester, CT) has been committed to complex medical molding applications. Founded in 1996, the supplier supports medical device OEMs with product design, tooling and molding, assembly operations, product testing, and project management. To that end, it provides components for medical and surgical equipment, diagnostic devices, and other medical applications. Well into its second decade, the supplier prides itself in furnishing high-precision molded plastic parts fabricated under closely monitored conditions.

“From the start, Vision built an immediate foundation in the medical device industry,” remarks Steve Arnold, the company’s president. The firm was created to support sister company and strategic partner Advance Mold & Manufacturing (Manchester, CT), an injection mold supplier that was formed more than 50 years ago. “Making this commitment early on to medical device manufacturing has enabled us to develop robust documentation and quality systems,” Arnold adds.

With three Class 100,000 cleanrooms, the ISO 9001:2008– and ISO 13485:2003–certified company offers full-service molding solutions to medical device customers. Its molding machines range from 28 to 330 tn, supporting a spectrum of materials ranging from commodity resins to high-temperature, filled engineering thermoplastics.

“Enjoying the support of our sister company, we offer complete mold design and build services,” Arnold mentions. “By drawing on Advance’s assistance in conjunction with our own tool room, we can provide tooling support from concept through the life of the product.” Accustomed to making tools that can fabricate molded parts with tolerances down to 0.0001 in., the firm’s toolmakers can produce molds for high-cavitation, multiple-action, hot-runner, and tight-tolerance applications.

Over the years, Vision has expanded three times as a result of customer needs. “The company started out with four molding machines and now boasts nearly 30 presses in a facility that was built from the ground up,” Arnold explains. “The needs of cleanroom molding were taken into consideration at every step.”

Such expansions are going to good use, enabling Vision to fabricate components with complex geometries. “One of our OEM customers has its own molding operations but comes to us for difficult-to-mold products such as high-tolerance parts,” Arnold says. Thus, when it fills orders for laparoscopic stapling device components, dosage-metering devices, delivery devices, lens-replacement surgery parts, and implantable joint components, the company has 20/20 vision.

Vision Technical Molding
www.visionmolding.com

Booth #1043