• German Scientists Question Accuracy of Prominent Blood Glucose Meters

    A recent letter to Diabetes Care called into question the accuracy of blood glucose monitors in measuring low blood sugar.Nancy CrottiA letter to Diabetes Care by four German researchers cited a study that tested the accuracy of Bayer’s Contour Next blood glucose monitor; Roche Diagnostics’ Accu-Chek Aviva Nano; Abbott Diabetes Care. Inc.’s FreeStyle Lite; Nipro Diagnostics, Inc.’s Truetrack; and Johnson & Johnson’s One Touch Ultra 2 and One Touch Verio Pro.The study compared the devices...
  • Polymer Material Opens Door for Novel Stomach-Based Drug Delivery

    Researchers developed a pH-responsive polymer gel that could enable the development of new swallowable devices and capsules with ultra-long drug delivery capabilities. Kristopher SturgisShiyi Zhang, postdoc at Koch Institute, holding a ring-shaped prototype, which can be folded into a swallowable capsule (shown on the right) for safe oral delivery. A new pH-responsive polymer gel could enable long-acting devices to reside in the stomach for days, weeks, or even months on end following...
  • How Philips Made App-based Ultrasound a Reality

    Previous innovations, and collaboration with FDA, helped Philips when it came to creating ultrasound that simply plugs into a smart device, says a Philips vice president who helped lead the project.Randy HamlinChris NewmarkerRoyal Philips in September will start selling an FDA-cleared ultrasound transducer called Lumify that simply plugs into a tablet computer via its USB port. The interface runs off an app on the tablet.Call it the birth of app-based ultrasound.Qmed recently interviewed Randy...
  • Who Has the Most Interesting Desk in Medtech?

    A person’s desk can say a lot about what’s important to them and how they get things done. What can each other’s desks and workspaces teach us about the medical device industry? Let’s find out.Chris NewmarkerMy desk in my home office, outside MinneapolisThey’re the places where many of us get things done. They’re the places where the magic happens.Desks and workspaces also can say a lot about their owners and the industries they work in. (Email me at chris.newmarker@ubm.com with a picture...
  • Synthesizing Graphene Quantum Dots into Bioimaging Probes

    Researchers are exploiting the nontoxic, fluorescent capabilities of quantum dots to enhance medical imaging. Kristopher SturgisA group of researchers from San Jose State University (SJSU) believe graphene quantum dots could be the next big step in bioimaging technology.While working on their masters in biomedical engineering, Aneshkumar Tilwani and Hildegarde Bell teamed up to explore the potentials of small crystals of graphene with a diameter of less than 50 nanometers—something known as...
  • Using Ultrasound to Boost Wound Healing

    Researchers have developed a new handheld ultrasound device that could reportedly accelerate the healing process in skin wounds.The ultrasound device in use (Image courtesy of Sheffield University)Kristopher SturgisScientists from Sheffield University say their low-intensity ultrasound device can reduce the healing time of skin ulcers and bedsores by as much as 30%, according to a university news release.The handheld device was developed by Mark Bass, a PhD in biochemistry at the British...
  • Here's Why 3-D Injection Molding Might Not Work for You

    The technology is a helpful tool, but it has limits for now, says the president of an award-winning medical device design company.Chris Newmarker3-D injection molding seems like a potential godsend for prototyping because it supposedly marries the fast turnaround time of 3-D printing with the reliability of injection molding. You can quickly 3-D print the molding tool and then start injection molding prototypes right away.As is usually the case when a “cool, unique” technology gets hyped, the...
  • Bard Hit with Wide-Ranging Warning Letter

    Bard has announced that it has received a warning letter citing quality system and medical device reporting violations. Qmed StaffThe Bard PV Recovery Cone was mentioned in the warning letter. The Los Angeles District office of the FDA has handed Bard a warning letter, it revealed in an SEC document. The document mentioned quality systems and medical device reporting violations that FDA had identified earlier in Form 483 documents related to audits of its facilities in Glens Falls, NY and Tempe...
  • Why Wearables Aren't Living Up to the Hype

    Wearables aren’t doing what they need to, but there’s a way forward, says an entrepreneur in the space. Penders also told ESC attendees to embrace regulation to a medtech-level stamp of approval.Qmed StaffToday’s wearables still provide “limited information and limited accuracy,” Julien Penders, co-founder and chief operating officer of pregnancy tracking startup Bloom Technologies (San Francisco), said Tuesday at the Embedded Systems Conference in San Jose.One recent review of wearable devices...
  • Is This the Answer to the Superbug Scare?

    Health providers are showing interest in a dishwasher-like device amid superbug deaths related to a tough-to-clean endoscope.The LIC machine (Image courtesy of Proven Process Medical Devices)More Stories:Why Duodenoscope Infections Could Affect Entire Medtech FDA Panel Deems Duodenoscopes to Be UnsafeDOJ Is Investigating Olympus DuodenoscopesChris NewmarkerUCLA’s Ronald Reagan Medical Center plans to install Langford IC Systems’ “LIC” machine to clean endoscopes in the aftermath of a...
  • This Is How You Wirelessly Provide Brain Control

    U.S. scientists have developed a new wireless brain probe made of soft materials that can simultaneously deliver drugs and lights to the brain to help control neurons. (Image courtesy of of Jeong lab, University of Colorado Boulder)Kristopher SturgisA remote-controlled, next-gen tissue implant could enable neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons inside the brain to elicit controlled reactions.The new device—created by researchers at the Washington University School of...
  • Helping Diabetics Deal with Data Overload

    One of type-1 diabetics’ biggest hurdles is making sense of mountains of sometimes chaotic-seeming data.   Brian BuntzChris Snider will be speaking on challenges diabetics face next week at  Stanford Med X Meetup hosted at UBM's San Francisco office. “I have to quantify myself just to stay alive,” says Chris Snider, who serves on the executive board of the Stanford Medicine X conference and has been living with type-1 diabetes since 2002. “That is an interesting perspective to...
  • 6 Robotic Breakthroughs That Could Matter for Medtech

    Science fiction presents visions of robots playing an integral role in society or even waging war against humanity. But what advances will matter for the medical device industry? What is the next frontier for medical robotics?(function(t,e,s,n){var o,c,r;t.SMCX=t.SMCX||[],e.getElementById(n)||(o=e.getElementsByTagName(s),c=o[o.length-1],r=e.createElement(s),r.type="text/javascript",r.async=!0,r.id=n,r.src=["https:"===location.protocol?"https://":"http://","widget.surveymonkey.com/collect/...
  • Could Bacteria Be Turned Into Living Medical Devices?

    MIT researchers are using sensors, memory switches, and circuits to enable a common bacterium found in the gut to detect certain diseases and immune disorders. Kristopher SturgisThis MIT illustration shows Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (white) living on cells in the gut (large pink cells coated in microvilli) and being activated by added chemical signals (small green dots) to express specific genes, such as those encoding light-generating luciferase proteins (glowing bacteria). (Image courtesy...
  • Bone-Inspired Silicon Shapes Could Boost Biocompatibility of Implants

    Tiny silicon spicules could one day improve the integration between implantable electronics and their recipient. Kristopher SturgisMinute bone-like silicon shapes could one day provide a bridge between soft tissue and hard materials, according to a University of Chicago (UC) news release.“Our skeleton-like silicon spicules show great potential in a wide range of applications where enhanced electronics-biology interface is desired,” according to Bozhi Tian, assistant professor in chemistry at...
  • The Greatest Medtech Innovation of 2015

    An ancient art form has potentially solved a major design hurdle for wearable devices. Our readers think it could have a profound effect on medtech. A series of surveys found them picking it as the best technology of the year so far.Chris NewmarkerBinghamton University engineer Seokheun Choi needed his paper-based biobatteries to be able to fit in more compact spaces. He found the answer in origami. (Image courtesy of Binghamton University)How can you make solid lithium-ion batteries stretch?...
  • Finding New Ways to Shape Graphene

    Researchers are developing new techniques to shape graphene, and are exploring new ways to make use of the versatile material.Kristopher SturgisRice University researchers have developed a new simple technique that can turn carbon nanotubes into valuable graphene nanoribbons by literally grinding the nanotubes down. (Image courtesy of Rice University)Researchers have been able to do some amazing things with graphene lately, as they continue to exploit its unique...
  • How a Jet Engine Sensor Became a Tiny Heart Failure Monitor

    The sensing technology at the heart of the CardioMEMS HF system was inspired by a MEMS sensor designed to monitor the pressure within jet engines.Brian BuntzThe current version of St. Jude Medical's CardioMEMS HF device is about the size of a paper clip.A decade ago, Jay Yadav, MD, former director of vascular intervention at the Cleveland Clinic, had the idea of taking pressure sensor technology designed for jet engines, and using it inside the pulmonary artery. Both were tubes, after all.“They...
  • Have a Great Idea for a Healthcare Product? Pitch It to Us

    BIOMEDevice San Jose will include a “Rapid-Fire Pitch Competition.” Here's how you can get in on the action.Qmed StaffThe organizers of BIOMEDevice San Jose are offering a chance for healthcare technology startups to gain publicity by participating in the inaugural “Rapid-Fire Pitch Competition.” Ten startups will each have the opportunity to present their one-minute elevator pitch to a panel of investors to gain invaluable feedback and a chance to secure investment....
  • How the First Disposable Surgical Ratchet Was Made

    In this Q&A, a developer of surgical instruments explains how a novel device for use in orthopedic procedures was conceived and developed.Brian BuntzReusable ratchets for surgical orthopedic procedures can cost more than $1000 per unit—not to mention the high costs of cleaning and maintaining them.With hospitals and clinics across the country looking for ways to cut costs, the surgical device firm ECA Medical Instruments (Thousand Oaks, CA) has debuted the first disposable surgical ratchet—...