• Why Google Wants to Put Nanoparticles in Your Body

    Google has infiltrated so much of our lives; now it wants to get inside our bodies, via disease-detecting nanoparticles.The tech giant has announced its ambitious project to develop nanoparticles that would be coated with a disease-detecting substance and possibly packed into a pill, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. 5 Ways Google Could Transform Medtech, and Maybe Cheat DeathGoogle’s cofounders may have once downplayed that they’re interested in turning the tech...
  • 3 Questions You Should Ask about Surface Coatings

    Biocoat Inc. (Horsham, PA) plays an important role in the medical device industry with its Hydak-brand immobilized hyaluronan coatings technology, which can be applied on most commonly used polymers and metals using a relatively simple process using conventional coating equipment and curing ovens. Biocoat president and CEO Keith Edwards during his Wednesday presentation at MD&M Minneapolis“We are strictly there for those clients that want lubricity, and they want to be able to...
  • How a Prevalidated Rigid Packaging System May Cut Costs, Save Time

    The BargerVPAK is a prevalidated, off-the-shelf packaging solution.After kicking around the notion of launching an off-the-shelf rigid packaging system for some time, Elkhart, IN–based Barger, which specializes in custom medical packaging solutions, finally pulled the trigger. Upon custom-designing the sterile packaging system for a client, Barger realized its broader potential as a prevalidated stock system for spinal and extremities implants. And the BargerVPAK was born."In our market,...
  • How a Shape Memory Polymer Could Drive Medical Device Innovation

    Shape-shifting thiolene/acrylates could open the door for a whole new host of applications in medtech, according to Walter E. Voit, assistant professor of bioengineering at the University of Texas at Dallas. Walter E. VoitSpeaking Thursday at MD&M Minneapolis, Voit said 3M Co. undertook research on thiol-type polymers in the late 1970s, but shelf life issues and small commercials their adoption.. But it was only in recent years that Voit and fellow researchers at UT Dallas latched...
  • The Top Medical Technologies of 2015 according to the Cleveland Clinic

    Today the Cleveland Clinic announced its annual list of top medical innovations that are most likely to have a major impact on patient care in 2015. Among the various breakthrough technologies is a mobile stroke ambulance, a new quick and painless blood-testing method, and the world’s first dengue fever vaccine.The list of emerging technologies and drug therapies was put together by a panel of 110 Cleveland Clinic physicians and scientists, and was announced at this year’s 2014 Medical...
  • What the Target Data Breach Fiasco Should Teach Medtech

    It was one of the major stories in the Twin Cities over the past year: personal data on up to 70 million Target Corp. customers stolen by hackers.Olayinka James Medical device companies actually have a great deal to learn from the story, because the Target hackers didn’t make a frontal assault on the Minneapolis-based company; the hackers came in through a third-part HVAC company’s systems, says Olayinka James, recently promoted to a new chief information security officer (CISO) position...
  • FDA Approves New One-Hour Ebola Test

    The global ebola scare has driven considerable innovation. It seems that not a day goes by that some new anti-ebola technology is announced. We recently reported that a new paper-based diagnostic for the virus was developed.Now, the FDA has temporarily approved a new Ebola test known as FilmArray BioThreat-E, an innovative new test that can produce results in an hour rather than the standard day or two needed for today’s existing methods.The test was developed by bioMérieux, and was designed to...
  • Meet The New Paper-Based Ebola Test

    While ebola fears continue to escalate, be it for rational or irrational reasons, the need for detection and the prevention of any major outbreak continues to be a high priority. The elevated threat level has lead to an innovative new genetic test that can detect the presence of ebola, among other viruses, all with the simple use of a diagnostic paper strip.A photo of the slips of paper that could serve as a diagnostic tool for various microbes.James Collins, a synthetic biologist at Boston...
  • New Battery Can Charge in Minutes

    Scientists in Singapore have developed a new battery technology that could be recharged up to 70% in only two minutes. The potentially revolutionary technology will also have a longer lifespan that can last over 20 years.In a news release from Nanyang Technological University, details were released about the battery that would have potential applications across a wide range of industries from electric cars to power-hungry portable medical devices and machines.NTU’s scientists developed the...
  • Microscopic Devices 'Walk' to Cancer Cells

    Nature has developed a knack for guiding cells, enzymes, and molecules in the body to specific structures and locations. White blood cells easily find their way to the site of an infection, while scar-forming cells easily flock toward the site of a wound. However, replicating this sort of autonomous cell activity to benefit medicine has been a process that has long eluded science for many years. That is, until recently when researchers from MIT demonstrated a brand new target-finding mechanism...
  • Bionic Eye Enables Man to See for First Time in Decades

    Recently, a patient from North Carolina became just the seventh person in the U.S. to have a bionic eye implant activated to help restore his vision.In a news release from Duke University, the world was introduced to Larry Hester, a patient  suffering from retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease that causes severe vision impairment and often blindness. At the time of his diagnosis, little was known about the disease, much less any effective treatments. The disease took Hester’s...
  • Device Hacking May Have Become a Homeland Security Issue

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is apparently taking a greater interest in medical device cybersecurity, if a report from Reuters is to be believed.Reuters recently cited a “senior official at the agency” saying Homeland Security’s Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team, or ICS-CERT, is investigating about two dozen cases of suspected medtech cybersecurity flaws. There have been no reported hacking instances, but Homeland Security officials consider the threat great...
  • When Materials Choices Are Not Intuitive

    The look and feel of technology is evolving at a breathtaking clip. Consider how far we have come: it wasn’t long ago that most desktop computers were colored in an unimaginative shade of gray. Early cell phones, too, were roughly the same color and roughly the size of a brick.Now picture the iPad and iPhone and their chic use of glass and aluminum. Clever material choices, coupled with the miniaturization of electronics, have enabled substantial breakthroughs in technology’s ability to evoke a...
  • The Scariest Medical Device Recalls of 2014

    Any product recall is bad. But that is especially true in medtech—where the life of patients is often at stake.Dos and Don'ts (Slideshow)Whether it’s striving for simplicity in design or recognizing that people are capable of countless mistakes while using something, Qmed has collected feedback from our audience and added it to our list of dos and don’ts.Read on to find out more.The causes for such dangerous and potentially deadly errors leading to Class I recalls are varied, whether...
  • How to Spark a Revolution in Medical Plastics

    The medical device industry has been pretty much using the same plastics and polymers for decades: workhorse materials including polyurethanes; polytetrafluoroethylene, or PTFE (marketed in other fields as Teflon by Dupont); and polyethylene terephthalate (sometimes marketed as Dacron) have been medtech mainstays. Michael DruesAnd while Vascular Sciences president Michael Drues thinks such materials have played a commendable role advancing medtech, he can’t help but thinking the industry...
  • Why You Might Not Be Able to Trust Your Local Blood Pressure Kiosk

    These days it’s never been easier to grab a simple blood pressure reading. Blood pressure kiosks have been popping up on almost every corner, from your local drug and grocery stores, to gymnasiums and even hair salons. But according to a recent report from the Food and Drug Administration, that convenience may be coming at the cost of reliable results. Illustration courtesy of FDARecently the FDA issued an advisory over the accuracy of results reported by these blood pressure kiosks,...
  • How to Shrink Implantables Using Piezoelectricity and Ultrasound

    The quest for new technologies that can enable the development of miniaturized medical devices has occupied designers, engineers, and manufacturers for years. Now, researchers at Stanford University have announced that they can miniaturize medical devices using a combination of the piezoelectric effect and ultrasound. Eventually, the researchers foresee that their technology could be used in a host of applications, including neural recording, cardiac mapping, temperature and pressure sensing,...
  • 4 Emerging Sensing Technologies You Need to Know About

    The XPRIZE Foundation has announced the 11 finalists selected for the $2.25-million Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE. The competition was designed to develop breakthrough medical sensing technologies that will enable faster diagnostic processes and more efficient health monitoring.Teams are competing for a $525,000 prize and up to five distinguished awards, each valued at $120,000. Each team was required to submit a technology that will accurately, reliably, and effectively collect meaningful data that...
  • Researchers Rev Up Low-Dose CT

    An unfortunate byproduct of CT scans is the possibility of exposing patients to high doses of radiation, which can increase cancer risk. For that reason, many experts recommend low-dose CT scanners. Unfortunately, low-dose CT scans require a half an hour or more of subsequent image processing time. A new $1.9-million study at the University of Michigan seeks to combat the problem with a new low-dose CT scanning system that can process the CT scans in just five minutes.In a recent news release...
  • What Superfast Wi-Fi Could Mean for Medtech

     This week Samsung announced its plans to develop a 60 GHz Wi-Fi that can operate at speeds five times faster than today’s traditional standard speeds. While to most, this may simply equate to faster download speeds for Youtube videos and downloading music, it could prove truly revolutionary to the medtech industry.  The news follows on the heels of its announcement last year to debut a 5G wireless standard that is slated to debut in 2020.  The tech giant reports that the new Wi-...