• How to Spot Infection in the Body Fast

    Researchers from the Wyss Institute develop a new pathogen detection technology that quickly and efficiently reports the presence of infection in the body, even at the earliest stages.Kristopher SturgisFcMBL proteins (grey) bind to the infectious E.coli bacteria (blue). (Image courtesy of Wyss Institute at Harvard University)The new technology would be a boon for doctors dealing with patients susceptible to infection, as there are no current methods that can quickly detect systemic bloodstream...
  • New Bio-Ink Could Be Bioprinting Breakthrough

    British researchers think their invention could eventually enable 3-D printing of living ortho implants, using patients' own stem cells. Chris NewmarkerUniversity of Bristol researchers say they were able to engineer 3-D printed tissue structures including a full-size tracheal cartilage ring over five weeks, using a special bio-ink formulation created after an arduous trial and error process. The researchers suspect the bio-ink could eventually be used to print complex...
  • Voice Detection of Brain Injuries

        Detecting whether someone has a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury can be tough. But early diagnosis only makes treatment more effective. Medical providers soon will have a new tool at their disposal: the injured person’s own voice. Researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory developed an algorithm for using speech to diagnose mild traumatic brain injuries. It has succeeded with assessing people’s mental or cognitive states by identifying a variety of changes associated...
  • Rapid Gunshot Repair

        Those suffering from a gunshot wound faces the danger of bleeding out, especially when the wound is in a hard-to-tourniquet area like an armpit or groin. The new FDA-approved XStat Rapid Hemostatis System, made by RevMedX (Wilsonville, OR), helps first responders stop the bleeding. A large injector syringe filled with tablet-sized sponges, the XStat rapidly slows bleeding and prevents hemorrhage. When injected into a wound, 92 cellulose sponges with an absorbent...
  • Organs on Chips

         Microchips already power so much of our technology. But they might have a new role: testing emerging medication. Scientists at Harvard's Wyss Institute recently developed a way to bring drugs to market with chip technology. Organs on chips are made from a flexible polymer about the size of a memory stick, each containing a hollow channel lined with living human cells. They mimic the microarchitecture and functions of living organs like lungs, hearts, and intestines,...
  • Electronic Medicine

        Pacemakers already do wonders treating heart conditions with electricity. What if electrical stimulation could treat other medical problems? DARPA is developing its Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) system to prevent and treat inflammation, chronic pain, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Instead of using pills or injections, ElectRx deploys electrical stimulation to get the nervous system working right. It artificially modulates the body’s essential peripheral nerves,...
  • Surgical Assist

        Operating on the battlefield is fraught with peril, especially for risky and complex procedures. And sometimes physicians in remote setting just don’t have the expertise to handle certain emergencies. A new augmented reality system from Purdue and Indiana universities will help specialists share their expertise and guidance from a distance. Called the System for Telementoring with Augmented Reality (STAR), it includes a transparent, moveable display that captures images of...
  • Artificial Spleens Against Sepsis

        Preparing for antibiotics’ waning effectiveness from drug-resistant microbes, the military discovered a new way to treat dangerous infections. Every year, 18 million people worldwide develop sepsis, a life-threatening complication from infection, and 30% to 50% die. Soldiers especially are at risk. DARPA’s Dialysis-Like Therapeutics (DLT) program recently developed a system to filter blood to remove the pathogens and toxins that cause sepsis. DLT works like a traditional...
  • Robotic Intubation

        A blocked airway is life-threatening, and every second counts. It can be especially challenging to intubate and open someone’s airway when they are obese, choking, or have difficult anatomies. But robots are stepping up to the challenge. Thanks to technology developed at Ohio State University, a robotic endoscopic device intubates using an electric motor controlled by a small computer. It receives 3-D mapping information from a small speaker that emits sound and magnetic...
  • Nanoparticles to the Rescue!

         After an explosion, soldiers are at extremely high-risk for dangerous internal bleeding. Such bleeding in the lungs often is fatal, unless medics quickly get the injured to a military hospital. New nanotechnology might reduce lung injuries by prompting faster internal blood clot formation and reducing the inflammation that causes cell death. Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Virginia Tech recently developed injectable hemostatic dexamethasone...
  • Bionic Arm

        Becoming a bionic man—or woman—is no longer the distant dream of futuristic writers. People with amputated arms soon will take advantage of the Luke Arm, a bionic prosthetic developed by New Hampshire–based DEKA, with funding from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). A complicated device with more than 800 parts, the arm uses sensors in the wearer’s shoe and limb stump to control the robotic arm. It’s dexterous enough to handle a grape and available for...
  • Exoskeletons

        Soldiers might not be able to leap tall in buildings in a single bound, but they will be stronger and more agile when wearing this exosuit. Designed by the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard and DARPA’s Warrior Web program, the exoskeleton lightens the load for those boots on the ground. They often carry gear weighing more than 100 lb, which can cause musculoskeletal injury when worn during physically active missions. These lightweight suits—...
  • 10 Ways the Military Is Boosting Medtech

        The U.S. military has played a crucial role advancing medical technology. Here are 10 recent examples of military-related medtech advances that caught our eye.Suzy FrischThe military constantly contends with complex and evolving medical challenges for current and former soldiers, inspiring it to develop numerous medical advancements. These breakthroughs help soldiers stay safe in precarious battlefield situations and heal from significant medical problems. Ultimately,...
  • Analog Computers May Be Better at Body Simulations

    Researchers from MIT design a new analog compiler (Yes, that's right: analog.) that could pave the way to efficient and accurate simulations of organs and biological organisms.Kristopher SturgisVarious differential equations can be translated into voltages and current flows across an analog chip. (Image courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)Last week MIT researchers debuted their new compiler for analog computers at the Association for Computing Machinery’s conference on Programming...
  • DNA Tests for Early Cancer Detection

        Illumina, one of the largest DNA sequencing companies, early this year announced the formation of a startup known as Grail, which plans to develop blood tests that can potentially detect many cancers for the cost of $1000 or less. The company said at the time that it hopes to make the technology available by 2019. It could be offered through a personal physician’s office, or possibly through a network of testing centers.Read the full Qmed story.Discover how medtech is...
  • Finding Infection Fast

        Researchers from the Wyss Institute have developed a new pathogen detection technology that they claim quickly and efficiently reports the presence of infection in the body, even at the earliest stages. There are no current methods that can quickly detect systemic bloodstream infections that lead to life-threatening sepsis. Donald Ingber, MD, and founding director of the Wyss Institute, says this new diagnostic test could speed up the process of detection by days. Read...
  • How Motors Are Enabling a Pioneering Cardio Device

    An intra-aortic pump delivered by catheter holds promise to help heart failure patients' hearts rest and heal. But it needed the right motor.Qmed StaffProcyrion's Aortix required a special type of motor to do its job. (Image courtesy of Procyrion) Houston-based Procyrion has an intra-aortic pump, presently in the preclinical stage, that is only 6 mm by 6.5 cm long and is actually deployed deployed with a s elf-expanding anchoring system downstream of the heart in the femoral...
  • 7 IVD Breakthroughs You Need to Know

         There have been a slew of major research advances in the field. Here are seven that especially stood out.Chris NewmarkerIt’s been the best of times for IVD. It’s been the worst of times.Silicon Valley darling Theranos, which promised widespread tests using only a single drop of blood, is mired in legal and business troubles amid a Wall Street Journal investigation that’s raised serious questions about its technology. Meanwhile, FDA has showed increased interest in...
  • Heart Attack Detector Runs on One Blood Drop

        Koninklijke Philips recently came out with a handheld blood test that it claims can cut the time to diagnose a heart attack from one hour to less than 10 minutes. The Minicare I-20 system measures cardiac troponin I (cTnI), a protein that is excreted by the heart muscle into the blood following a heart attack. The Minicare I-20 delivers on-the-spot test results comparable with those obtained in a laboratory, enabling the physician to decide on treatment without delay,...
  • A Photon Sensor for for Super-Fast Biodetection

        For years researchers have understood the correlation between cancer and the mechanical properties of cells. But they lacked the ability to measure and use these mechanical properties diagnostically. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently developed a technique that will could that gap, and enhance our understanding of how diseases modify the mechanical property of cells in the human body.Read the full Qmed story.Continue >>[Image...