• Top Hospital Embraces Therapeutic Virtual Reality

    A new partnership between Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and AppliedVR will bring virtual reality content to patients in the hospital's orthopedic, spine, and surgery centers.Kristopher SturgisAppliedVR, a leader in virtual reality content, has announced a partnership with Cedars-Sinai Medical Center to introduce therapeutic virtual reality content to patients in the hospital’s spine, orthopedic, and surgery centers.Stay on top of emerging trends in medtech by attending the MD&M Minneapolis...
  • Boston Scientific Beefs Up Neuromodulation Business with Latest Acquisition

    The company has acquired Massachusetts-based Cosman Medical Inc., which makes radiofrequency ablation systems for treatment of chronic pain.Nancy CrottiBoston Scientific is adding to its neuromodulation business with the acquisition of a privately owned radiofrequency ablation company.Don't miss the MD&M Minneapolis conference and expo, September 21 & 22, 2016.The Marlborough, MA, medtech giant has acquired Cosman Medical Inc. in nearby Burlington, MA, for an undisclosed sum....
  • Microneedle Monitors Drug Levels Without Drawing Blood

    A microreactor inside the needle measures drug concentrations in fluid just below the outer layer of skin.Nancy CrottiResearchers have created a microneedle drug monitoringsystem that can collect fluid and analyze the concentrationof a drug in the bloodstream.Researchers may have discovered a way to measure drug levels in blood without actually drawing any blood.Scientists from University of British Columbia and the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland invented a microneedle that can...
  • Edwards Lifesciences's TAVR Sales Soared in Q2

    Sales of Edwards's transcatheter heart valve therapy products grew nearly 50% over the same quarter last year, according to the company's most recent earnings report.Qmed StaffEdwards Lifesciences’s financial performance in the second quarter of 2016 exceeded leadership’s expectations thanks in part to strong sales of the company’s transcatheter heart valve therapy products.Hear from Edwards Lifesciences and other innovators in the structural heart space at the MD&M Minneapolis...
  • Placenta-on-a-Chip Could Help Preemie Babies

    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have produced a placenta-on-a-chip, and their study could help determine causes of premature birth.Nancy CrottiEngineers have replicated human lungs, livers, intestines, eyes, and skin on computer chips. Add to that growing list the human placenta.Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have produced a placenta-on-a-chip that can “fully model the transport of nutrients across the placental barrier,” according to a statement from the university...
  • CMS's New Bundled Payments Plan Could Be a Boon for Medtech

    The agency’s proposal for streamlining high-volume, high-expense episodes of care, including heart attacks, could present opportunities for medical device companies to help hospitals better manage patients.Nancy CrottiThe Obama administration has released a proposal to bundle Medicare payments to hospitals for heart attacks, coronary artery bypass graft procedures, and surgical treatments for broken hips and femurs, excluding joint replacements.Don't miss the MD&M Minneapolis conference and...
  • Stryker Reprocessing Facility Hit with Class I Recall

    Stryker Sustainability Solutions is recalling angiographic catheters that could break off inside patients, causing injury or death.Nancy CrottiA Stryker medical device reprocessing facility is recalling unused catheters with either incorrect or nonexistent expiration dates because their tips might break inside a patient, causing injury or death.Don't miss the MD&M Minneapolis conference and expo September 21 & 22, 2016.Customers were notified June 1, 2016, to return the resterilized...
  • FDA Issues Draft Guidance to Clarify UDI Form, Content

    New draft guidance issued by FDA provides information to help labelers and issuing agencies ensure unique device identifiers contain the right information and present it in the right format. Qmed StaffThere has been much uncertainty as the medical device industry shifts to FDA’s Unique Device Identification rule, and today the agency released draft guidance intended to clear the air regarding two aspects of the rule: the form and content of the Unique Device Identifier. Don't miss the...
  • Olympus Execs Discouraged Early Warning on Problem Scopes

    Emails show that Olympus Corp. executives told employees it wasn’t necessary to inform U.S. hospitals when problems related to contaminated duodenoscopes initially came to light in Europe.Nancy CrottiOlympus Corp. executives based in Japan told U.S. employees not to warn hospitals in the United States about contaminated scopes that led to superbug outbreaks in Europe, according to a Kaiser Health News report.Don't miss the MD&M Minneapolis conference and expo September 21 & 22, 2016....
  • Smart Threads for Data Sharing

        Researchers from UC Berkeley have developed a way to coat the threading of clothing with thermochromic paint that can change colors to represent data and information, including health data. It could provide another tool for designers of mobile health devices. (Read the full Qmed story.)Read About 10 More Promising Medical Technologies>>[Image courtesy of UC Berkeley]
  • A Swimming Robot Powered by Heart Cells

        A Harvard University professor wants build a human heart, so he started out making a “living” stingray robot—about the size of a nickel and powered by rat cells. The small robot is even able to maneuver around obstacle courses with beams of light. So how could this lead to a robo-heart? Researchers said the stingray robot represents a "“a first step in engineering multilevel systems that link neurodynamics, mechanics, and complex controllable gaits—coupling sensory...
  • Preventing Heart Attacks With an Electromechanical Hug

        Korean researchers recently demonstrated how wire wrap could stop rapid heart beat and restore cardiac electrical function for a rat's heart. The shape-conforming mesh is constructed of silver nanowires embedded in a rubber polymer. It was designed to conform to different hearts' unique anatomy. (Read the full Qmed story.) Other researchers including the flexible electronics pioneer John Rogers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have also been working...
  • Enabling the Paralyzed to Once Again Move Limbs

        NeuroLife technology developed at Ohio State University and Battelle enabled a paralyzed young man, Ian Burkhart, to once again move his wrist and hand, and complete tasks such as strumming a guitar and swiping a credit card. It's all thanks to a chip implanted in his brain and machine-learning algorithms that decode the signals. The chip is connected to a port in the skull via a wire, with the cable delivering the information to a computer. The computer then uses...
  • Changing the Way Drugs Are Prescribed

         OneOme (Minneapolis) provides patients with a pharmacogenomic test that then informs their health providers via an algorithm-based clinical decision support, helping the health providers to tailor prescriptions to exactly fit patients' needs. The decision support covers 340 medications for more than 20 medical indications. And it has a better chance of succeeding because it came out of a healthcare environment, co-developed and exclusively licensed...
  • This Small Device Could Boost Lung Research

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists tissue-engineered an artificial lung into a small plastic microfluidic device, creating an opportunity to test human lung response to drugs, toxins, and other conditions.Kristopher SturgisResearchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) nicknamed the plastic artificial lung “PuLMo” for pulmonary lung model. Much like the human lung, the technology consists of two major parts: the bronchiolar unit and the alveolar unit. The unit was designed to...
  • 5 More Medical Technologies to Watch

        Prescription drugs customized through genetic testing and a brain implant that enables people with paralysis to regain movement in their limbs are among the additional medical technologies we’ve come across since posting our original list of the 10 most promising medical technologies of 2016.Read on to find out about more promising medical technologies.Continue >>Don't miss the MD&M Minneapolis conference and expo, September 21–22, 2016.Chris Newmarker is senior...
  • J&J Settles Acclarent Case for $18 Million

    The settlement comes just days after the former executives who ran Acclarent were convicted of misdemeanor charges related to alleged off-label marketing of sinus balloon catheters.Chris NewmarkerThis image was pulled from a 2011 clinical study describing the The MicroFlow spacer as "A Drug-Eluting Stent for the Ethmoid Sinus." The image shows the device's reservoir and shaft in "A" and the reservoir's features in "B."Johnson & Johnson Acclarent subsidiary will pay $18 million to...
  • Could 'The Doctor' Become Reality?

        The television series Star Trek: Voyager included "The Doctor," an Emergency Medical Hologram (EMH) that ended up having to become the fulltime doctor on the ship.While artificial intelligence isn't going to replace doctors any time soon, it could increasingly aid them with research and analysis. There is growing evidence that artificial intelligence can truly help health providers spot signs of illness in patients, including such deadly maladies as cancer.On a...
  • Scanadu

         Scanadu, a Silicon Valley medtech company, has been one of the most well-known of the Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE finalists, with its investigational Scanadu Scout device that has shipped to study participants and Indiegogo backers. Scanadu has now joined forces with one of the other competition finalists, Intelesens (formerly Zensor), which is led by Jim McLaughlin, director of NIBEC at Ulster University in Northern Ireland in the U.K.Continue >>
  • Hypospray Equals Jet Injector

         In the Star Trek universe, the hypospray was able to get medications into patients  through their skin, even their clothes, without using needles. In real life, this device was the jet injector, which never really became widespread because of concerns over cross-contamination, since even the tiniest particles of blood retained in such devices could include viruses. Development of new and improved jet injectors continues, though. Shown above is an illustration...