• 2010s: Glasses Will Beam Images into Our Eyes

        By the end of this decade, glasses will be able to beam images directly to the retina, Kurzweil says. While Google Glass has failed to capture the support of the public thus far, perhaps later versions of heads-up-display technology will make good on Kurzweil’s prediction. Headsets like Google Glass may ultimately prove to be important technologies in medicine. Already some study data supports that Google Glass can improve the performance of surgeons.No matter what, heads-up-...
  • The Future of Medical Technology according to Ray Kurzweil

    Ray Kurzweil has made a name for himself for making outlandish technology forecasts, many of which have proven accurate. Here, we summarize some of his predictions that could have the largest implications on medicine.Qmed Staff        Although Ray Kurzweil’s initial claim to fame was his inventions (including the flatbed scanner, the first print-to-speech convertor for the blind, and a groundbreaking music synthesizer), he has received more attention in past decades for...
  • How Excimer Lasers and Ultrafast Lasers Compare for Polymer Micromachining

    It can be a complex calculus to weigh the pros and cons of various laser technologies for polymer micromachining. Here is some guidance on the subject.Pascal Miller, PhDFor the past few decades, excimer lasers have been widely used for the laser micromachining of polymers in the life science industry. With the recent advances of high power ultrafast lasers, these new laser sources are being considered for certain polymer machining applications. The selection criteria for the most optimum laser...
  • CMS Inspection Finds Problems at Theranos: WSJ

    In its latest salvo against the blood-testing company, the Wall Street Journal reports that Theranos could lose CMS backing unless it corrects deficiencies found in its facilities. It also states that the company heavily relies on outsourcing partners for some complex blood tests.Qmed StaffU.S. health inspectors associated with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) discovered serious deficiencies at Theranos Inc.’s facilities in Silicon Valley, according to the Wall Street...
  • Did a Man Make a Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Out of Junk?

    A welder claims to have rigged together an ultralow-budget bionic arm after a disease left his left arm paralyzed. But is it real?Brian BuntzAfter 31-year-old Balinese man found himself unable to provide for his family after suffering from a stroke, he says he took to the Internet to look for information on creating a bionic arm. Using scrap parts and used metal, he reports coming up with a functional device that relays signals from his brain to his arm using electrodes attached to his scalp....
  • The Greatest Medical Devices of All Time, Take Two

    In the past couple of years, we have received more than 2000 results in a poll asking readers to help pick the greatest medical devices of all time—with some feeling like additional technologies should have been considered in the roundup. With that feedback in mind, we’ve launched a new poll dedicated to the question.Qmed StaffAfter receiving more than 2000 votes from our audience, you would think that it is fairly straightforward which devices deserve to be called the greatest of all time. But...
  • Brain Research Bombshell Could Kickstart New Era of Computing

    It turns out that your brain’s capacity to remember is 10 times higher than previously thought, according to Salk Institute researchers. The discovery could ultimately help lead to the development super-efficient computer chips. Qmed StaffTerry Sejnowski foresees a new era of computing based on neuroscience breakthroughs. Image of Sejnowski (left) and two of his colleagues Cailey Bromer (center) and Tom Bartol (right) above.Imagine being able to remember half of the data held by all U.S....
  • Are Medtech Engineers Fairly Paid?

    Many of our readers apparently don’t think they are justly compensated based on a Qmed survey.Brian BuntzWhat is it that is driving engineers to risk prison time to steal intellectual property?In 2014, we wrote of an engineer who formerly worked for Becton, Dickinson and Co. (BD; Franklin Lakes, NJ) and C.R. Bard Inc. (Murray Hill, NJ) who admitted to stealing trade secrets from the two global medical technology companies. In that same year, we also caught wind of a GE Healthcare engineer who...
  • Was a Head Transplant Performed on Monkey?

    Last year, the renegade Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero garnered international attention by announcing his intent to perform a human head transplant in 2017. Now he claims that a head transplant has been recently performed on a monkey and that mice with severed spinal cords are capable of moving their limbs. While Canavero suggests that head transplants could offer hope to people who are paralyzed, skeptics question his approach.Qmed StaffChinese researchers have announced that the second...
  • Where Smart Clothing Is Headed: Q&A

    Wearable technologies are beginning their transition into the realm of fashion through innovative smart clothing technologies.Kristopher Sturgis     OK, we’ve all heard how wearables are the future, how the market for them is set to explode, etc. But something is amiss in the wearables landscape if the plight of market leader Fitbit is any indication. The company’s stock is now worth considerably less than it was when the company had its IPO last summer. In addition, the...
  • Smart Shirts That Keep You Connected

        New smart shirt technologies will making getting fit as easy as getting dressed. Hexoskin debuted the new technology at CES this year, offering Bluetooth capabilities that enable users to connect to their fitness apps, cardiac sensors that can track heart rate, and breathing sensors that can track respiratory rates and tidal volumes.The company Omsignal has also been getting attention for its smart shirt and smart bra technology.With sensors located closer to the heart,...
  • Flexible EMG Sensors That Capture Biometric Data

        Fitness tracking could soar to new heights with the development of a BioStamp Research Connect System, known as the BioStampRC. It’s a wearable sensor specifically designed for enhanced medical research that captures movement and biometric data in real time. The sensor contains an accelerometer, a 6-axis gyroscope, and electrodes that capture electrophysiological data like an EMG or ECG. The data is stored on the device and can be transferred via Bluetooth technology to a...
  • Smart Suits: Integrating Technology Into Everyday Outfits

        Developers don’t intend to limit wearables to just workout clothing and accessories. Samsung recently showcased the world’s first smart suit equipped with an NFC chip in its sleeve, in an effort to continue the integration of technology into everyday outfits. The company showcased several other items at CES this year including a purse (known as Sol Bag) with a built-in battery for charging smartphones without a cable, and the Perfect Wallet, which also comes equipped with an...
  • Smart Socks: Tracking Movement, Heart, and Respiratory Rates

        Is there really more than meets the eye when looking at a sock? That’s certainly the intent behind Owelet’s new smart sock technology. This sensor-lined sock was designed to monitor vital signs in infants through the foot, and transmit the data to a smartphone app via Bluetooth. The technology allows parents to monitor a baby’s skin temperature, heart rate, blood oxygen levels, and even sleep patterns at a moment's notice. An updated version is expected later this year that...
  • Smart Shoes Carving Out A Footprint

        Nike looks to get in on the ground floor of smart shoe technology with the release of the limited edition Nike Mag sneakers, modeled after the shoe worn by Michael J. Fox in the 1989 film Back To The Future II. The sneakers come equipped with self tying capabilities, and the ability to sense the wearer’s motion to provide “adaptive on-demand comfort and support.” The company Under Armour, with its SpeedForm 2 Gemini Smart Shoe, aims to measure distance, pace, and...
  • 5 of the Most-Promising Smart Clothing Technologies

            Kristopher SturgisWearable technologies have come a long way over the last few years, and while some didn’t quite live up to the hype (we’re looking at you Google Glass), others have certainly hinted at the promise of wearables. This year’s CES expo showcased a bevy of new wearable technologies that have taken a more fashionable approach.The above image is courtesy HexoskinLearn more about cutting-edge medical devices at MD&M West, February 9–11 at the...
  • How Sequencing Technology Helped Tackle the Last Ebola Outbreak

    A well-funded virologist armed with next-gen genetic sequencing technology was able to help track the spread of Ebola in Sierra Leone with unprecedented speed.Brian BuntzThe semiconductor technology from Thermo Fisher (Carlsbad, CA) used in the Ion PGM sequencer enables the sequencer to be used in portable locations—even within a tent-based lab during Sierra Leone's Ebola outbreak. The device measures 24 x 20 x 21 in.Ian Goodfellow, a virologist at the University of Cambridge, was shaken by a...
  • Could This Super Film Lead to Mobile Cancer Detectors?

    A University of Michigan–developed film could enable more precise, less expensive monitoring for cancer survivors, according to its creators.Qmed StaffThe thin flexible film induces circular polarization of light. (Image courtesy of University of Michigan)Circular polarization of light has shown promise for detecting cancer. The process, however, requires large, expensive machines to generate the circularly polarized light.University of Michigan researchers, however, think they have hit on a...
  • Stryker Accused of Hiding Metal-on-Metal Spine Implant Problems

    Recent Ohio lawsuits claim that Stryker implanted a dangerous device in a clinical study without sharing information regarding its risks.Qmed StaffCourt documents show that the CerviCore device design had been substantially redesigned to address FDA concerns about the device causing metal poisoning. Fourteen plaintiffs in Ohio have brought lawsuits against Stryker, alleging that its CerviCore artificial discs are so dangerous that the company abandoned a clinical trial related to the...
  • Dangerous Scopes Needlessly Injured Hundreds

    Major duodenoscope maker Olympus and FDA failed to alert the U.S. public, even as hundreds became infected with superbugs, according to a U.S. Senate report released this week.Chris NewmarkerPictures of a contaminated Olympus TJF-Q180V closed-channel duodenoscope, taken during a 2012 investigation in the Netherlands that Olympus participated in. The O-ring shows signs of wear, and the actuator-side area is heavily covered with brown scale. (Image from the Senate...