• Using a T-Shirt Printer to Make Medical Circuits

    Researchers in Singapore have managed to print sophisticated electronic circuits with a T-shirt printer. The circuits’ resistors, transistors, and capacitors are made using nontoxic materials such as silver nanoparticles, carbon, and plastics. The circuits can be deposited on a range of materials, including common ones including paper, plastic, and aluminum foil.Led by printed electronics expert Joseph Chang, a Nanyang Technological University professor, the research could be used for a broad...
  • Microneedle Technology Could Treat Major Eye Diseases

    A new treatment option involving microneedle technology is being explored for patients suffering from two major eye diseases: glaucoma and corneal neovascularization. The technology could provide a new avenue to deliver drugs to specific areas within the eye to target different diseases.The details were released in the November 13th issue of Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, a journal supported by the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The research was...
  • 4 Questions Mobile Health Designers Should Ask

    Officials at pioneering flexible electronics company MC10 are researching how to adapt their technology to track the progression of Parkinson’s disease, muscular dystrophy, ALS, and similar movement disorders. The questions they are asking involve design challenges that most device designers in the mobile health space need to consider. MC10 has technology for flexible, stretchable electronics. (Photo courtesy of MC10)The research stems from a development partnership Cambridge, MA–...
  • This Degradable Material Is Tough Over the Long Haul

    One limitation of many resorbable biomaterials is their strength profile. While offering considerable strength upfront, their durability degrades quickly over time. One company, Novus Scientific (Uppsala, Sweden), sought to solve this problem through a material innovation that involved knitting two degradable polymers together to create a surgical mesh that provides tissue support for six to nine months.The first of the two polymers, a copolymer of glycolide, lactide and trimethylene...
  • How an NBA Player Created a Medical Device

    Former New York Knicks player Jonathan Bender came up with the idea for a Class I medical device after suffering from a knee injury that proved to be a problem on the basketball court. A creative person by nature, Bender had the idea for what would come to be called the JB Intensive Trainer—a device that can relieve stress on joints while strengthening the muscles supporting them. Bender made the first prototype of the device, fashioning it out of parts from the local hardware store.After...
  • 6 Things to Remember When Working with an EMS Provider

    There can be plenty to juggle when partnering with an electronic manufacturing services (EMS) provider. Here’s how to avoid dropping one of the balls.By Chris Alessio, VP Sales and Programs, Hunter Technology Corp.Medtech OEMs should consider working with an EMS listed as an IPC Trusted Manufacturing Source. Shown here is Hunter's facility in Milpitas, CA.The path to a finished medical device is studded with stringent requirements, substantial investments, and federal and state limitations....
  • New Implantable Diabetes Device Receives Major Backing

    A tiny drug-loaded implantable pump that can be used to help treat patients with Type 2 diabetes has received significant financial backing from French pharmaceutical company Servier. The French company believes that the device developed by Boston-based startup Intarcia Therapeutics can transform the global market for patients with diabetes. Intarcia’s lead product candidate, ITCA 650 (continuous subcutaneous delivery of exenatide), as shown on the company's website.Servier recently...
  • Drone Ambulance Network Could Save Lives in Europe

    When someone suffers cardiac arrest, every second counts. This photo from Delft University of Technology demonstrates how the ambulance drone might work.With that in mind, a Dutch researcher has developed an “ambulance drone” that weighs about 9 lbs., is capable of carrying another 9 lbs., and can fly at a speed of 62 mph, reducing ambulance response time from 10 minutes to 1 minute.Graduate student Alex Momont of Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands said in a YouTube...
  • A Remarkably Simple Gadget That Could Spur Medtech Advances

    HSI Sensing used the recent MD&M Minneapolis show to debut a reed switch with a mechanism that is the opposite of most other reed switches—with plenty of resulting advantages. The reed switch HSI Sensing was showing off at MD&M Minneapolis was about a centimeter long. (Photo by Chris Newmarker)Reed switches usually have switches that close in the presence of a magnet or magnetic force, with the switches used to control whether a device is on or off.  Chickasha, OK–based HSI...
  • How The Ebola Crisis Has Sparked Innovation

    The simmering fears of a possible global Ebola epidemic, however unlikely one may be, has certainly sent shockwaves through the healthcare industry. From helping to catalyze groundbreaking discoveries in diagnostics and treatments to completely revamping the process of isolating and reducing the risk of spreading the virus, the heightened sense of awareness is improving our understanding of how to contain infectious diseases. Slideshow: 10 Ebola-Fighting TechnologiesWhich technologies have...
  • Why Lean and Six Sigma Should Matter to You

    Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma principles are more important for the medical device industry than ever before, says Dave Schleder, director of OEM/international operations at B. Braun (Allentown, PA).That’s because these decades-old production philosophies can go a long way in helping medical device companies respond to the increased cost pressures and quality requirements they are facing, Schleder says.Dave Schleder is director of OEM and International Operations at B. Braun’s OEM Division....
  • The New Ortho Material Innovation You Need to Know About

    German researchers recently have been engaged in pioneering work involving biodegradable orthopedic materials that are materially strong enough to be suture anchors. The demonstrator for a suture anchor made of iron-tricalcium phosphate (FE-TCP)is only slightly larger than a match head, according to Fraunhofer. (Image courtesy of Fraunhofer)Their innovation involves using powder injection molding to manufacture a suture anchor made of degradable metal-ceramic composites, according to...
  • How a Ubiquitous Device Could Save Even More Lives

    Researchers from MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics have recently discovered an algorithm that could help medical professionals quickly determine whether or not a patient is suffering from acute emphysema versus heart failure, based on readings from a common piece of medical equipment. A capnograph, as shown on WikipediaIn a news release from MIT news, details were revealed about the work of several professors working alongside physicians from Harvard Medical School and the Einstein...
  • This Headpiece Changes Color Through Thoughts

    Brain interface technology has long since been considered the ultimate user interface experience, giving us the power to control computers and mechanical systems with thought alone. While we still have a ways to go before we see a truly noninvasive, long-lasting brain interface device, we are seeing some brilliant advancements in technology that are bringing the idea to life. The color-changing headpiece, as shown on The Unseen's website.For the first time, researchers are utilizing...
  • Google Glass Concerns Continue to Mount

    Google Glass has piqued the interest of consumers and medtech experts from around the globe. But the initial buzz seems to be calming as potential vision and headache issues rise to the fore.A recent study of participants who wore the head-mounted display system found that the glasses create peripheral vision obstruction, creating significant blind spots that could prove to be hazardous.The study—conducted at the University of California, San Francisco and published in a recent issue of the The...
  • Synthetic Collagen Fibers Could Revolutionize Tissue Engineering

    Researchers at Rice University recently published a pair of papers detailing an advanced understanding of collagen fibers, and how they can self-assemble with their sticky ends. Further research could lead to better synthetic collagen for tissue engineering for both cosmetic and reconstructive medicine. Rice University graduate student Katherine Jochim, left, and chemist Jeffrey Hartgerink demonstrated the self-assembly of standalone, sticky-ended triple helices that form collagen, the...
  • How a Tragic Stomach Tumor Led to a New Medical Device

    Sometimes something good can come out of tragedy and heartbreak. That seems to be exactly what happened in the case of the Fitzgeralds, a family who amid the loss of their young daughter achieved a medical device innovation that could shape the lives of others in a positive way.The CareAline Sleeve, as shown on the company's websiteMike and Kezia Fitzgerald were still adapting to life as new parents when doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital found a cancerous tumor in the stomach of their...
  • Why Google Wants to Put Nanoparticles in Your Body

    Google has infiltrated so much of our lives; now it wants to get inside our bodies, via disease-detecting nanoparticles.The tech giant has announced its ambitious project to develop nanoparticles that would be coated with a disease-detecting substance and possibly packed into a pill, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. 5 Ways Google Could Transform Medtech, and Maybe Cheat DeathGoogle’s cofounders may have once downplayed that they’re interested in turning the tech...
  • 3 Questions You Should Ask about Surface Coatings

    Biocoat Inc. (Horsham, PA) plays an important role in the medical device industry with its Hydak-brand immobilized hyaluronan coatings technology, which can be applied on most commonly used polymers and metals using a relatively simple process using conventional coating equipment and curing ovens. Biocoat president and CEO Keith Edwards during his Wednesday presentation at MD&M Minneapolis“We are strictly there for those clients that want lubricity, and they want to be able to...
  • How a Prevalidated Rigid Packaging System May Cut Costs, Save Time

    The BargerVPAK is a prevalidated, off-the-shelf packaging solution.After kicking around the notion of launching an off-the-shelf rigid packaging system for some time, Elkhart, IN–based Barger, which specializes in custom medical packaging solutions, finally pulled the trigger. Upon custom-designing the sterile packaging system for a client, Barger realized its broader potential as a prevalidated stock system for spinal and extremities implants. And the BargerVPAK was born."In our market,...