• 3-D Printing Market Expected to Grow 40% Annually

    The technology will make good on its promise to enable the Third Industrial Revolution, says the investment firm Ark Invest (New York City).  Brian BuntzSure, 3-D printing has been hyped. But in many ways, the technology is undervalued, maintains ARK Invest, which anticipates that the annual growth rate for the technology will be approximately 40% for the next five years. “It is $5.5 billion dollars today. We see it going to $40 billion by 2020,” says ARK Invest analyst Tasha Keeney,...
  • 10 of Medtech's Greatest Women Medtech Innovators

    To commemorate Women's History Month this March, Qmed has created a [summary] of some of the most outstanding female inventors in the medical device field.  Qmed Staff A groundbreaking probe for removing cataracts was developed by a woman—as was the radioimmunoassay, the microelectrode, the modern syringe, and many other technologies. Read on to learn about some of the most important contributions to medicine from female innovators.  1. Marie CurieMadame Curie is one of the...
  • Medtech Employee Accused of Accepting $75,000 in Bribes

    A resident of Monroe, NY is charged with taking a $75,000 bribe for a deal between a metallurgical technology company and his employer, an NJ-based medical device company that was unnamed in the complaint filed in United States District Court in New Jersey.  Qmed Staff On March 23, the United States Attorney's Office announced that it was charging Daniel Lawrynowicz (46) with accepting a $75,000 bribe for securing a contract with a metallurgical company, a violation of the...
  • Apple Launches New Healthcare Platform

    The world’s most profitable company is launching another framework to help app developers enable patients to manage their medical conditions.Nancy CrottiApple chief operating officer Jeff Williams shows off Apple’s CareKit at the company's most recent keynote event.  Apple said it plans to release CareKit as an open source framework next month. It will consist of four modules that app developers can build upon:Care Card to track medication and prescribed activities such as physical therapy...
  • Researchers Edit HIV Out of Immune Cells

    Scientists have succeeded in cutting the virus responsible for AIDS out of cells in lab tests.Brian BuntzHIV image from Wikipedia. Scientists at Temple University Health System (Philadelphia, PA) have proclaimed that they may have a potential cure for patients infected with HIV. Using a custom gene editing system, the researchers have shown they can eliminate the virus from human cells in lab experiments.Lead by professor Kamel Khalili, Ph.D., the researchers targeted HIV-1 proviral DNA using a...
  • Indicted Ex-Acclarent CEO Opens Up in Interview

    The former CEO of Acclarent, Bill Facteau shares some of his thoughts about the fraud charges he is facing and explains why is optimistic about the future.Brian Buntz“If you can avoid getting indicted, that would be a good thing,” said Bill Facteau in an interview with Tom Salemi, content director of Healthegy from earlier in the year that is now making the rounds on the Internet.Facteau, who is currently the chairman, president, and CEO of Earlens, says he is looking forward to having his day...
  • Medtronic Moving Production out of Colorado Facility

    The Galway-domiciled company is transferring two manufacturing lines from an $18-million facility that was formerly operated by Covidien.Qmed StaffFollowing Medtronic’s roughly $50-billion acquisition of Covidien, the company is reevaluating the use of buildings it acquired. Earlier this month, the company announced that it would be closing its Mansfield, MA–based building that had formerly been the U.S. headquarters for Covidien.Now, Medtronic has announced that it is relocating two...
  • A Green Polymer Ten Times Stronger Than ABS

    U.S. researchers have come up with a much stronger and potentially less expensive alternative to the conventional polymer. Qmed StaffThe tough  plastic is made using 50% renewable content from biomass. Image from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy; conceptual art by Mark Robbins.ABS, or acrylonitrile, butadiene and styrene, is a workhorse polymer used for a range of medical device applications and in everyday objects such as car bumpers, many consumer product...
  • Cardiovascular Systems to Pay $8M to Settle Kickback Suit

    The company has agreed to pay millions over three years to settle a whistleblower lawsuit.Nancy CrottiIt’s the third blow in the past year for the New Brighton, MN–based company Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. In February, it disclosed in a regulatory filing that a shareholder class action lawsuit had been filed in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California against the company over the same allegations. That same month, it announced that David Martin had stepped down as CEO and...
  • Clinton Campaign Cancels Theranos Fundraiser, Relocates Event

    Mired in controversy, Theranos had planned on hosting a fundraiser for Hillary Clinton. The fundraiser was later moved to a private home.Qmed StaffTheranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes was featured at a Clinton fundraiser in Palo Alto, which was held at a private residence. Earlier reports suggested that the event would be held at a Theranos facility. Chelsea Clinton is shown on the right. Image from Ruby Cramer's Twitter feed. Media reports had been speculating why the Clinton campaign would agree to...
  • Johnson & Johnson Unveils Plan to Boost Its Medtech Segment

    The healthcare conglomerate has identified six business niches segments to invest in to boost its medical device segment.Brian BuntzJohnson & Johnson has seen the profitability of its consumer-product and medical device sectors flag in recent years, prompting activist investor Artisan Partners Limited Partnership to pressure the firm into spinning off those business units.The company’s executives recently shared their vision for growing its medical device business with a six-pronged plan...
  • FDA Considers Banning Powdered Surgical Gloves

    The agency has a proposal to ban most powdered medical gloves to protect patients and healthcare professionals.Brian BuntzOn March 21, FDA announced a plan to ban the majority of powdered gloves in the United States stating “they pose an unreasonable and substantial risk of illness or injury to health care providers, patients and other individuals who are exposed to them.”The move would apply to powdered surgeon’s gloves and examination gloves, which are regulated as Class I–medical devices.One...
  • How Light Might Prevent Cancer

    Light stimulation in conjunction with gene therapy has shown promise in research on frogs. Kristopher SturgisBiologists from Tufts University have demonstrated the possibility of treating and preventing the formation of tumors.The group demonstrated the effects of optogenetics when they injected the embryo cells of a frog with RNA encoding mutant oncogenes — genes that, under certain circumstances, can transform into a tumorous cell. Next, they activated either a blue-light for a positively...
  • Brain-Zapping Headphones Hit the Market

    Two startups have recently launched brain-stimulating headphones. One claims that its headphones will improve athletes’ ability to work out while the other claims that their product will lift users’ mood. Neither product is technically a medical device. Brian BuntzA growing number of startups are hoping that transcranial direct current stimulation will be the next frontier in wearables.One of the entrants in this field, Halo Neuroscience (San Francisco) says its brain-stimulating headphones can...
  • Introducing 'Salt' MRI Scans

    A British research institute has developed an MRI scanning technique that can identify sodium concentrations in the body to help detect disease.Brian BuntzBy tracking sodium concentrations in the body with MRI, researchers hope to advance the scientific understanding of kidney disease as well as understanding how sodium management occurs in the brain, lung, liver, and musculoskeletal system. Sodium plays a significant role in cellular function and some diseases can cause irregularities in how...
  • Novel Gel Boosts Blood Flow in Patients with Arterial Disease

    An injectable gel derived from the natural scaffolding in human muscle holds promise for treating arterial disease, say engineers at the University of California, San Diego.Kristopher SturgisThe tissue from skeletal muscle of pigs suspended in detergent eventually yields fibrous extracellular matrix remains for injection. A new treatment could be used to treat poor blood circulation caused by advanced peripheral artery disease, a condition that can lead to infection and limb amputation.The...
  • Meet the BIOMEDevice Boston Innovation Prize Finalists

    An affordable professional-grade 3-D printer and easily customized medical device motors are among the exhibitor innovations that will compete at the April 13–14 show in Boston.Chris NewmarkerVisit BIOMEDevice Boston and help us pick the BIOMEDevice Boston Innovation Prize winner among these five finalists, gleaned out of a group of 10 semifinalists. (The Innovation Tour to pick the winner will depart from Center Stage at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, April 13.) The...
  • New Shapeshifting 3-D Material Could Make for Better Stents

    Harvard University researchers developed a new, flexible, versatile material, which can be fine tuned to change its size and shape to adapt to different environments.Kristopher Sturgisvia GIPHYThe new material is a structure made of thin walls that can be folded, molded, and reshaped. The result is objects whose size, volume, and shape can be altered to form any number of architectural structures or objects.\Harvard researchers and engineers created the material with a composition that can...
  • The 10 Most Innovative BIOMEDevice Boston Suppliers

    An affordable professional-grade 3-D printer and an automatic interactive quoting system for prototyping are but some of the innovations among the 10 BIOMEDevice Boston Innovation Prize semifinalists. Help us pick the five finalists that will compete at the April 13–14 show.Chris NewmarkerMotors, operating systems, cables, coatings, 3-D printers, software—there are many innovations to be had on the floor of a major UBM medical device show such as BIOMEDevice Boston. Any one of them could...
  • The Top 10 510(k) Trends Since 2000

    Although the average time for FDA to clear a 510(k) application has been trending down in recent years, it had increased by 60% from 2000 to 2010, increasing from an average of 96 days in 2000 to 154 in 2010. Interestingly, the FDA’s data indicates that the delay was largely a result delays on the part of the submitter. Brian BuntzThe clearance process, established under the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 and reformed in the 1990s, provides a way for medical device manufacturers to get to...