• The Good, Bad, and Ugly of Presidents and Medical Devices

    Don't go searching for President's Day sales just yet. These four stories will get you in the "presidential" frame of mind—and hopefully provide some useful lessons.Chris NewmarkerPresident’s Day in the United States provides a time to draw lessons from the lives of the great people who have led America.That is actually true with medical devices, too. As with most other people, presidents have had their share of encounters with medical devices, with a mix of both tragic and inspiring results....
  • The Uberization of Healthcare

    The Uber business model will soon come to healthcare. Medical device developers should take notice. Stuart KartenStuart Karten is the founder of Karten Design, a firm that works both in the medical device and consumer technology sectors. Just as Uber changed transportation in positive—and sometimes controversial—ways, healthcare will be infiltrated by startups wanting to change the healthcare model from hospital-centric to patient-centric. Medical device companies and other healthcare providers...
  • How to Combine Imaging and Therapy in Nanoparticles to Combat Cancer

    Imaging techniques and tumor treatment therapies have combined to create a potentially powerful tool in cancer research. Kristopher SturgisResearchers from Imperial College London and the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris have designed and developed hybrid gold-silica nanoparticles, which could result in a genuine therapeutic tool providing both imaging capabilities and tumor treatment therapies.The team, consisting of a collection of international chemists and biomedical...
  • Why the Best Medtech Pros Think Big

    Because medical devices are but one piece of the healthcare ecosystem, it makes sense for medtech firms to design healthcare systems rather than devices alone. Brian Buntz“A company that is designing a product for the operating room doesn’t want to just supply, for instance, the operating table. They want to supply the lights, and just about everything else,” said Ben Davenport, site director at Nypro Healthcare, an outsourcing company based in Coppel, TX, in an interview at MD&M West. “...
  • Find Out the Most Innovative Medtech Exhibitor

    There are plenty of amazing things to see at the biggest medical device manufacturing event in the United States.Chris NewmarkerThe Auto-I 360, made by Interface Catheter Solutions, is inspecting a medical balloon for imperfections. This medical balloon can be used to treat peripheral vascular disease.Developers of a medical balloon inspection system, an innovative friction test for single-use medical devices, and a tiny magnetic reed sensor were among finalists vying Wednesday to become...
  • Usability in the Year 2045

    Medical device developers should think to the future when attempting to understand usability. Brian BuntzThe founder of Karten Design, Stuart Karten works with both the consumer technology and medical device sectors. No doubt about it, technological breakthroughs have empowered consumers tremendously in the past couple of decades. Now, you can do everything from make restaurant reservations to money transfers on your computing device of choice. The field of healthcare, however, has been slower...
  • Amazon VP on Why Future Wearables Will Be Magical

    There’s no telling what wearable computing devices will look like 20 years from now. But we can count on computers to get smaller and more personal as they evolve.Brian BuntzBabak Parviz explained in an MD&M West keynote address why wearables will matter for medtech and other tech fields. Just take a look at how computer have evolved in the past half century. Forty to 50 years ago, computers were warehouse sized and you had to get in a car to go drive to them, said Babak Parviz, vice...
  • Attacking Cancer Cells with Nanoparticles

    Cancer-fighting drugs together with nanohydrogels could be used to attack cancer cells without affecting other areas of the body.Kristopher SturgisIn the future, cancer treatments could be made more effective thanks to the development of a technology that combines thermosensitive nanoparticles (nanohydrogels) with cancer fighting drugs in order to better target cancer cells.Researchers at the University of Guadalajara in Mexico had the idea that anticancer drugs planted within nanohydrogels...
  • Designing Devices That Patients Want to Use

    Guess how much the problem of noncompliance costs the United States each year? $100 billion.Sridhar IyengarBrian BuntzOK, everyone knows that fostering patient compliance is a huge problem. Less certain is how to address it.Solving that problem is a matter of understanding users’ psychology and emotions, says Sridhar Iyengar, CTO of Misfit (Burlingame, CA), who delivered a talk Tuesday at MD&M West in Anaheim, CA. The best way to do that is through an anthropological approach rather...
  • Smartphone Device Simplifies HIV Diagnosis

    Updated February 10, 2015A new smartphone dongle has been developed to perform point-of-care HIV and syphilis tests from a finger prick in just 15 minutes. Kristopher SturgisAn inexpensive smartphone compatible device could detect HIV and syphillis. A new diagnostic device that works in tandem with your smartphone can perform a point-of-care test to detect major infectious disease markers—including HIV—from a single finger prick of blood, in just 15 minutes time.According to a team of...
  • Meet the Robots That Could Take on Biopsies, Drug Delivery, and More

    Soft robotics, armed with tiny flexible grippers, could be used for scores of medical applications, including biopsies, drug-delivery, and diagnostics.Kristopher SturgisPhoto of the star-shaped grippers that could one day be used to take biopsies.Robotics have unquestionably revolutionized the manufacturing industry, yet their use in medicine has been fairly limited until recently. While robotics are now being used for applications like surgery and sterilizing hospitals, a new breed of small...
  • Why Silicene Could Be The Key To Super-Fast Computing

    Graphene is so 2004. Instead of making circuits out of atomically thick carbon when you can make them out of atomically thick silicon?Kristopher SturgisSilicene image by Jojko Sivek.Researchers from the University of Texas have created the first transistor made of silicene, which is made up of a one-atom thick layer of silicon atoms.Silicon atoms from crystalline molecular structure similar to that of graphene, opening up the potential for exceptional electronic properties with possible...
  • How to Avoid Making a Medical Device Flop

    Developing a game-changing product can be incredibly tough, even if you have a brilliant team and tons of cash. Just ask Google. Qmed StaffIn the past several years, the Mountain View, CA–based tech giant has introduced Google Health, Google Glass, Google Buzz, Google Wave, Google Plus, and scores of other products that failed to make good on the initial hype that accompanied their release. And several of those projects, including Google Health, have been shuttered for good.Innovating in the...
  • How to Make a Disruptive Device That Wins FDA Approval

    Agamatrix and Misfit cofounder Sridhar Iyengar has some advice for medtech professionals hoping to win FDA’s support for innovative new medical devices.Brian BuntzSridhar Iyengar is the cofounder of Misfit and Agamatrix.How can a medical device company create an unprecedented product that can win regulatory approval? Qmed recently had the chance to interview Sridhar Iyengar, the cofounder of Agamatrix (maker of the iBGStar, an iPhone-compatible blood glucose meter) and Misfit (a wearables and...
  • Obama Doubles Down on Paying to Keep People Healthy

    The move could be a boon for health tracker developers, while device makers in general will have to focus more on “value.”Chris NewmarkerThe Obama administration is accelerating the U.S. healthcare system’s shift away from its old fee-for-service model—a move that could have far-reaching ramifications for medical device makers.Health trackers including wearables will likely be more in demand, while medical devices in general will have to demonstrate that they are helping the overall healthcare...
  • 3 Parent Babies Could Be Coming to UK

    The House of Commons' decision has sparked an intense debate, with opponents complaining of "designer babies." Supporters saying the procedure will prevent genetic diseases.Kristopher SturgisBritish lawmakers have approved a controversial and untried in vitro procedure that creates babies made from three people’s DNA. The decision—a first— permits scientists to use genetic material from two women and one man—the goal being to prevent the inheritance of genetic diseases.Lawmakers in the...
  • Peeking inside the Body Using Smallest-Ever CMOS Camera

    Based on CMOS technology, a tiny camera is suitable for a range of medical device applications.Minimally invasive surgery has been facilitated by the development of microcameras that can peer into tiny body cavities. The development of microcameras, in turn, has been facilitated by advancements in the area of integrated circuits. A case in point is the micro ScoutCam line of cameras. Bob MichaelsManufactured by Medigus Ltd. (Omer, Israel), the ScoutCam system is said to be the world smallest...
  • Will AI Be a Savior or a Demon for Medtech?

    The Terminator franchise popularized the notion of artificial intelligence becoming a threat to humanity. Terminator image from Flickr user Dick Thomas Johnson.So how long before artificial intelligence (AI) transcends the realm of gadgetry and makes its way into the workforce—including the medtech workforce? Already, AI is being used to design websites. Could robots design medical devices, say, a decade from now?It might not be as crazy as it sounds. In any event, the medical field is becoming...
  • Using Disarray to Create Order for Lasers, Medtech Sensors

    This illustration from UCLA shows light traveling through a photonic crystal superlattice. The holes have been randomly patterned. The result is a narrower beam of light.Controlling light at nanoscale wavelengths could boost the precision of lasers and data transfer on computer chips—and improve optical communications. Researchers at UCLA and Columbia have managed to do just that, controlling light at a wavelength measuring approximately 500 nm, comparable to the wavelength of visible light...
  • Why the 'Turnaround Test' Matters for Medical Devices and Wearables

    Above is Misfit's Bolt smart light bulb. Below is the Swarovski Shine fitness tracker. Misfit, the Burlingame, CA–based maker of the Shine and a lineup of other innovative products, is making waves in both the wearables and smart home markets. The origins of the company’s philosophy, however, lie in the medical device space--and how company officials cracked what they call the "turnaround test."Before we get into that, however, let’s take a look at what Misfit has accomplished since it was...