• Mobile Health Could Get Help From a Thing Grandmas Love

    It’s called embroidery. Ohio State University researchers have designed circuits that can be embroidered onto fabric with 0.1 mm precision.Kristopher Sturgis“These antennas will wirelessly transmit the sensed information to handheld devices like smartphones and tablets," says OSU research scientist Asimina Kiourti. (Image courtesy of Ohio State University)The market for wearable technologies continues to grow at a rapid pace, as developers look for new ways to integrate technology...
  • These Researchers Have Skin in the Game

    They’ve invented a polymer that could erase eye bags, improve skin moisture, and help patients with dermatitis.Nancy CrottiSays MIT professor Daniel Anderson: “It’s an invisible layer that can provide a barrier, provide cosmetic improvement, and potentially deliver a drug locally to the area that’s being treated.” (Image courtesy of Melanie Gonick/MIT)Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have invented an elastic, wearable polymer that can reduce eye bags and may someday deliver medication to help...
  • These Parents Are Tired of Waiting for Medtech, FDA

    Frustrated parents of kids with type 1 diabetes are going the do-it-yourself route, and making their own artificial pancreases.Nancy CrottiParents of diabetic children are the force behind the dual-chamber bionic pancreas dubbed the iLet. (Image courtesy of Boston University)Frustrated with how long it’s taking FDA to approve any manufacturer’s artificial pancreas, parents of children with type 1 diabetes are taking matters into their own hands.The Wall Street Journal reports that...
  • You Can Now Image Cells in Amazing Real Time 3-D

    Stanford researchers have discovered a new imaging method that provides a three dimensional view of the cells and molecules in a living animal in real time—an invention that could lead to improved forms of cancer detection and treatment.Kristopher SturgisGold nanorods can be viewed in real time within the blood vessels of a live mouse ear. (Image courtesy of Stanford)The recent work comes from some of the brightest minds of Bio-X, a Stanford University program designed to bring together...
  • How MIT Is Helping to Stop the Zika Virus' Spread

    MIT, Harvard University, and other research institutions are paving the way for a practical and cost effective Zika diagnostic tool for widespread use.Kristopher SturgisThe black cartridge contains the paper-based Zika diagnostic test. (Photo courtesy of MIT)A new diagnostic test consists of a black cartridge containing a paper that can diagnose the Zika virus within just a few hours, according to the MIT researchers who created it.The new test was designed to help doctors and clinicians...
  • Google Has Its Sights on Smart Eye Implants

    Its device would free people over 40 from bifocals and replace lenses damaged by cataracts.Nancy CrottiGoogle's patent application describes a lens that “can be installed within a flexible polymeric material shaped to conform to the inside surface of a lens capsule of an eye.” (Image from Google's patent application)Google has its eyes on an smart lens that can be implanted in the eye and might improve wearers’ vision.An application for the device filed in 2014 with the U.S. Patent and...
  • This Robot Can Beat Surgeons at Stitching

    What makes the Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot (STAR) such an important medical device advance is that it is automated, not manually controlled. Nancy CrottiThe Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot (STAR) has shown promise when it comes to performing on its own in a dynamic clinical environment. (Image courtesy of Children’s National Health System)Researchers have taught a robot how to perform a delicate procedure better than a human surgeon, according to the MIT Technology Review.The Smart...
  • Smartphone ECGs Are Just As Good as the Old Ones

    AliveCor's ECG monitor is as good as ambulatory ECG monitors to diagnose heart palpitations, according to results of a study.Arundhati ParmarThe AliveCor ECG—which is now branded as Kardia Mobile—consists of a pair of electrodes incorporated into a smartphone case. (Image courtesy of AliveCor)The diagnostic yield of the smartphone-enabled AliveCor heart monitor is comparable with that of a 14- to 30-day event monitor, according to a study abstract presented...
  • Greatbatch Is Betting Big on Wireless Energy Charging

    The medical device manufacturing outsourcer has greatly expanded its business relationship with WiTricity, which has wireless energy transfer technology.Chris Newmarker(Infograph courtesy of WiTricity) Greatbatch appears to be wagering that wireless energy transfer technology will prove to be an attractive feature in many medical devices, including implantables.Frisco, TX–based Greatbatch has licensed intellectual property from Watertown, MA–based WiTricity in order to incorporate...
  • 8 Innovations You Can't Miss at MD&M East

    From a new chemical-resistant alloy to an instant measuring system, here are just a few of the innovations medtech suppliers and service providers will be showcasing at the MD&M East expo in June. Jamie HartfordWith OEMs refocusing on core capabilities to increase innovation, it has never been more important for medtech companies to find trusted suppliers and contract partners. At the upcoming MD&M East expo, set to take place June 14–16, 2016, in New York City, more than 900...
  • This New Wearable Tech Aims to Tackle Tremors

    Trequant wants to help tremor patients quantify their disease to help them get better control over their lives.Arundhati ParmarTrequant's consumer device is worn on the wrist to measure the tremors afflicting its user, with information communicated to a companion mobile app where data can be recorded, tracked, and analyzed. (Image courtesy of Trequant)Inside a classic-looking watch lurks a digital health wearable that can help patients with tremor quantify that problem and get better control...
  • Delving Into the Secrets of Nanoparticles

    Stanford researchers are exploring phase-changing nanoparticles from the inside to better understand and optimize their performance.Kristopher SturgisIndividual phase-changing nanoparticles can vary in shape. (Image courtesy of Stanford)The study represents the latest in nanoparticle research that seeks to explore the potential of nanomaterials, specifically in energy and biomedical related technologies. Despite many recent technological breakthroughs relying on materials made from...
  • How the Artificial Heart Beat the Odds

    It was called a “Dracula” of the medical device world in the late 1980s. But it has now made a comeback, The New York Times recounts. Qmed Staff The New York Times Retro Report recently covered the “change of heart” that has taken place over artificial hearts since the pioneering surgeries of the 1980s.  After the public saw artificial heart recipient Bill Schroeder increasingly debilitated in a series of strokes over more than 600 days—until his final death—there was little...
  • Feel the Waves

        Just last year, FDA and the U.S. Department of Justice went after a man who marketed a machine called the Energy Wave. This device “consists of a micro-current frequency generator with a digital readout, two stainless steel cylinders, two personal application plates with connectors and lead wire for the cylinders and plates,” according to a DOJ statement.The company gave buyers an operating manual and a list of codes for 450 digital settings for the device. Among the...
  • Using an Industrial Laser on People?

        A laser is a laser, right? That’s what a California man apparently hoped people would believe when he used an industrial laser to treat their cancer and other medical conditions.“He generally charged these individuals $300 per laser ‘treatment,’” FDA said in a statement about Edward J. Brown. “However, if he ‘treated’ more than one family member, Brown would reduce his fee to $225 per treatment.”Brown was sentenced to two years in federal prison and a year of court...
  • The Dubious Device That Won't Go Away

        Some medtech hoaxes just won’t go away. Take the Toftness Device, marketed by a Wisconsin school of chiropractic to purportedly assist in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries.“There is a reason it looks like PVC piping and couplings…it is pvc piping and couplings!” says the website of the Museum of Quackery, whose collection now resides at the Science Museum of Minnesota.“Add six inexpensive plastic lenses and scan the patient's spine while rubbing the back of...
  • 7 of the Greatest Medtech Hoaxes Ever

        People will believe a lot of things, especially if they promise to treat or cure medical conditions.Nancy CrottiMany people believe that P.T. Barnum famously declared, “There’s a sucker born every minute.” A quick Google search will put that belief to rest.Even with today’s access to information, some unfortunates will pay for items that don’t do what they promise. The field of medical devices, while highly regulated, still has room for entrepreneurs who would profit from...
  • It Emits Sparks, So It Has to Work

         The Tesla Coil, manufactured in the 1920s, produced a  high-voltage, low-current discharge that ionized gases in the glass tubes. The tubes glowed blue emitted sparks when held near the body, convincing the public of their ability to treat a variety of ills from the comforts of their homes.Continue >>Image courtesy of M. Donald Blaufox, MD (www.mohma.org).
  • The 'Miracle' of Oxygen

        The Duplex Oxygenator, circa 1900, had two connectors attached to wires that ended in contacts, which could be strapped onto the patient. It was said to cure disease by oxygen. Continue >>Image courtesy of M. Donald Blaufox, MD (www.mohma.org).
  • Medical Device, or Torture Device?

        This counter irritant, from around 1870, may not look threatening. But underneath its cap are three circular rows totaling 35 needles, all for the purpose of puncturing the flesh. Lubricating oil was optional. The idea was to raise blisters and release whatever “force” was causing the illness. This one was a manual model. Others were spring-loaded. Either way, that’s a lot of irritation.Continue >>Image courtesy of M. Donald Blaufox, MD (www.mohma.org).