• 9. Polygraph

         A polygraph, commonly referred to as a lie detector, was designed to measure and record physiological responses of a person under different conditions. Starting in 1895 in Italy, it was used in criminology to determine if a suspect was telling the truth. Additional modifications were made over time and, in 1921, a device considered to be the original modern polygraph was developed.A polygraph measures variables such as blood pressure, pulse, respiration, and skin...
  • 10. Electro-cautery Radio Knife

         Cauterization, first used in the 16th century, was a method of burning body parts, such as a blood vessels or open wounds to stop bleeding and close amputations. It was thought to prevent infection. In the modern era, doctors use electrocautery devices, which are not heated by fire but instead by an electric current. The unit is powered by a Tesla coil, which produces the high-frequency alternating current needed to make precise cuts and sterilize the area.This 1930s...
  • 7 Ways to Get Your Medical Device on the U.S. Market (Infographic)

    Here's an infographic on the seven possible ways to market medical devices in the United States, inspired by a MED Institute whitepaper titled "Seven Ways to Legally Market Your Medical Device in the U.S." 
  • Nanotechnology Paves Way for World's First Implantable Artificial Kidney

    Researchers at Vanderbilt University see significant progress on an implantable artificial kidney device made from microchip technology and living kidney cells.Kristopher SturgisThe artificial kidney make use of microchip filters. Image courtesy of Vanderbilt University Medical Center. A novel device can mimic the filtration functions of the human kidney, specifically through the use of microchip filters that can help remove waste products and hopefully keep patients off dialysis. Each...
  • Stem Cell Treatment Could Possibly Cure Blindness

    A controversial stem cell treatment apparently is enabling some blind patients to be able to see, including a patient named Vanna Belton from Cockeysville, PA who had been blind some five years before treatment.Brian BuntzHaving lost her vision for about five years from optic neuritis, the 29-year Vanna Belton opted to have an experimental stem cell treatment. A week after treatment, she noticed that she was able to read license plates. A week after that, she was able out people's’ faces....
  • Walgreens Wants to Dump Theranos

    The pharmacy retail giant is pushing to cut ties with the troubled blood-testing firm Theranos, which would require breaking its partnership contract.Qmed StaffTheranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes had received widespread adulation from media until late last year, when The Wall Street Journal published a series of negative articles about the company.  Walgreens had been the biggest customer of Theranos but the Financial Times states that the company is hoping to close its 40 or so blood...
  • 10 Highlights of BIOMEDevice Boston

    We preview some of the most exciting conference session at this year’s BIOMEDevice Boston event held in mid-April.Brian BuntzThis year’s BIOMEDevice Boston event, held April 13–14, will feature a full-day conference track on the second day of the event. The summary below provides a summary of nine of these sessions as well as a short preview of a keynote on the opening day of the event.1. Why Makers Matter for the Future of U.S. ManufacturingMIT professor and “Maker” Kipp Bradford (...
  • How to Accelerate the Biosensor Revolution: Laser Micro Manufacturing Focus

    Laser micro machining is playing an important role in fostering the development of novel wearable sensors.  Glenn OguraFigure 1: This stainless steel part demonstrates the precision offered by micro-needle fabrication.Biosensor technology is fueling an explosion in the amount of health-related data that is directly collected from the human body. These tiny, intricate devices can sit on top of the skin or deep within tissue or vasculature. The industry demands millions of sensors each year...
  • The Toughest Medtech Interview Questions

         The Toughest Medtech Interview QuestionsWe rounded up some of the toughest interview questions from 10 of the biggest medical device employers, including Glassdoor’s ranking of the interview difficulty.Continue >> Don't miss the BIOMEDevice San Jose conference and expo, December 7–8, 2016.
  • 1. Stryker

    1. StrykerGlassdoor Interview difficulty ranking: 3.4Although Stryker had one of the highest interview difficulty rankings among the medical device companies we sampled, many of the sample questions provided seems common, such as “Describe your strengths and weaknesses” or “How would you be an asset to the company.”Sample questions:What is something that was particularly complicated for you in your engineering courses and how would you explain that topic to a group of high school students who...
  • 2. Intuitive Surgical

         2. Intuitive SurgicalGlassdoor Interview difficulty ranking: 3.3Many of the respondents in Glassdoor’s review of Intuitive Surgical stated that the interviews there were straightforward yet the company has a 3.3 average out of 5 for interview difficulty.   Sample questions:Walk us through a complex analysis or experiment that you conducted.    How many degrees of freedom does this instrument have?How does this manipulator maintain dual parallel...
  • 3. Medtronic

         3. MedtronicGlassdoor Interview difficulty ranking: 3.0The majority of questions provided by Glassdoor users seemed to typical: “tell me about yourself,” “why should we hire you,” or “tell me about a failure you’ve overcome.”Sample questions:How do you tell a surgeon he is doing something inadequate?  Explain a time when a project you were working on did not go as planned. How did you turn it around?How would you deal with being asked to perform a test procedure...
  • 4. BD

         4. BDGlassdoor Interview difficulty ranking: 2.9Some of the interview questions cited on Glassdoor were fairly technical for engineering positions or were simply difficult questions about personal weaknesses. Shown above is the ribbon cutting for a new Advance Diabetes Care headquarters in Andover, MA.Examples include:There is a block parallel to a fixed wall. The surface of the block is covered by triangles which coincide with one triangle of similar size attached to a...
  • 5. Philips

         5. PhilipsGlassdoor Interview difficulty ranking: 2.9While many interviewers noted that the questions were conventional, several people who were interviewed noted that the questions were fairly detailed or technical and that there was an aptitude test that preceded the interview. Shown above are Henk van Houten (left), global head of Philips Research, and MIT Associate Provost Karen Gleason (right) shake hands amid the Philips-MIT research collaboration.Sample...
  • 6. Johnson & Johnson

         6. Johnson & Johnson Johnson & Johnson Interview Questions: Glassdoor (Scientist and senior scientist jobs)Interview Difficulty: 2.9How does high-performance liquid chromatographywork?  Tell me about a time that you've failed…Name a time when you had to make a decision with limited information...What part of our credo do you relate most to? (Hint: The credo is available on the company's website.) Continue >>
  • 7. Boston Scientific

         7. Boston ScientificInterview difficulty: 2.8Sample Questions:How many medical device and pharmaceutical manufacturers are there in the US?  (Sample answer: According to the interviewer there are ~12,000 registered medical device manufacturers and fewer drug manufacturers.)Does FDA approve safe devices? Have you supported audits? Have you worked on 510(k) submissions?  (Sample answer: The answer was essentially "no, they approve labeling" and what...
  • 8. Cardinal Health

         8. Cardinal HealthInterview Difficulty: 2.8How many hospital beds are in the US?How many gas stations are in the United States? (Questions like these are all about how you formulate a thoughtful answer. Once I did that, she wanted a number. I said between 150k-175k, and she said she looked it up ahead of time, 168k.)What is your current experience with HAZMAT, DOT, and computer entry programs?  What would your least favorite teacher say about you?  Describe a...
  • 9. Baxter

         9. BaxterInterview Difficulty: 2.8What's the difference between a DHR and a DMR?What different types of software inspection are laid out in IEC 62304?How would you set up a TMV for a Gage R&R?How would you handle a situation where the team is several weeks behind schedule and you're the final reviewer and find issues in a software module test?  What do you know about systems development life cycle (SDLC)?  What type(s) of engineering tools you would use to...
  • 10. St. Jude Medical Interview Questions

         10. St. Jude Medical Interview Questions Interview Difficulty: 2.8What is your solid modeling experience and what tasks can you perform with it?How does this component work?  Have you had conflicts with other co-workers?  What had you learnt in the past that motivated you to be an Engineer?What were you able to negotiate? What advice would you give others considering an offer?What could I have done differently to convince my current employer that a...
  • Using Light to Suture Wounds

    A new fiber-optic technology that delivers light deep into human tissue has been harnessed to bond tissue and heal wounds unlike ever before. The breakthrough could transform photomedicine.Kristopher SturgisThe use of dye in conjunction with green light could be used to stitch wounds. Photo from University of St. Andrews.A process known as photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) can be used to treat superficial wounds without sutures or staples. It could also be possibly used to treat tumors....