• Diabetes Patients Stress User Experience in Device Selection

    Survey results released by Cambridge Consultants (Cambridge, MA) today support mounting evidence that the user experience is paramount for diabetes patients when selecting a drug-delivery device. Based on responses from more than 240 diabetes patients that currently use a combination product, the survey's results indicate a dissatisfaction with current diabetes devices and, thus, substantial opportunity. As MPMN has reported over the years, diabetes patients have long lamented the clunky and...
  • New NMR Spectroscopy Method Could Lead to Future Diagnostic Devices

    Standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy requires the use of a very high magnetic field created by large superconducting magnets cooled by liquid helium. Because this method is unwieldy and expensive, it cannot translate into small medical diagnostic devices. Now, however, an article posted at physicsworld.com published by the Institute of Physics (London) reports that a group of researchers at the Nuclear Science Division at the University of California, Berkeley has learned how...
  • Students Test Stent Material in Simulated Arteries

    Device designers are likely familiar with achieving very different results when testing components in vivo, compared with those obtained in vitro. A team of students at Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) have made advances in testing stent materials both inside and outside the body, however, by testing materials in the aortas of rats. This method has enabled them to create a way to replicate what happens to manmade devices inside a simulated blood vessel.Students created a...
  • Artificial Collagen-Based Wound-Care Tissue Promotes Vascular Growth

    Scientists from Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) have developed an artificial wound-care tissue that promotes vascular growth. The new material could encourage healthy skin to invade the wound area, hasten healing, and reduce the need for surgery.Known as a dermal template, the material was engineered in the lab of Abraham Stroock, an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and member of the Kavli Institute for Nanoscale Science, in collaboration with Jason A. Spector,...
  • Students Develop Printer for Making Blood Vessels

    Students at Colorado State University (Fort Collins) have developed a printer that can 'print' artificial blood vessels from living cells. In contrast to current technologies, which can produce 2-D blood vessels, the students' printer is capable of creating 3-D scaffolds with cells embedded throughout them.The printer, according to Colorado State mechanical engineering professor David Prawel, has three printer heads, each of which is loaded with a syringe. While one syringe deposits a polymer...
  • MIT Researchers Team Up With Industry Experts to Bring Healthcare Devices Home

    With the increasing use of mobile phones and tablets in the medical industry, there is also an increased opportunity to develop new telehealth-related technologies for portable medical devices. In light of this potential, equipment supplier Analog Devices Inc. (Norwood, MA), which specializes in semiconductors for signal-processing applications, announced a collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT; Cambridge, MA) to research and develop technologies for next-...
  • Carbon Nanofibers Help Patch Up A Broken Heart

    As countless angst-ridden ballads have taught us: Mending a broken heart isn't easy. And this concept isn't restricted to emotional heartbreak; it also holds true for a physically damaged heart. In fact, nerve and other cells in the heart are often lost forever as a result of such trauma as a heart attack. But good news may be on the horizon thanks to engineers at Brown University (Providence, RI) and the India Institute of Technology Kanpur that have created a carbon nanofiber-based scaffold...
  • Is Medical Device Design Going to the Dogs?

    The Massachusetts-based Worcester Business Journal featured an interesting opinion piece today proposing that the medical device industry could benefit from research and work being done in the field of veterinary science. In the piece, Deborah T. Kochevar, dean of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine of Tufts University, opines that collaboration with veterinary clinician scientists could help the FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) to achieve its aim of accelerating...
  • Injectable Microgel Particles Could Enhance Tissue Repair

    Building on recent research into doubly crosslinked microgels (DX microgels), scientists at the University of Manchester (UK) have developed a new class of DX microgels that are pH responsive. By linking these microgel particles together, the researchers believe that the resulting biomaterial could have application in minimally invasive soft- and load-bearing tissue repair. Injectable doubly crosslinked microgels from the University of Manchester may help to treat degenerative...
  • The iPad Touches Medical Device Design

    andersDX offers the FlushTouch custom design service for touch screen applications in the medical device industry.Thanks to its sleek, compact design and touch-based user interface, the iPad has inspired a tablet computer craze while revolutionizing consumer electronics design. Taking advantage of the iPad's widespread popularity and user-friendly interface, a growing number of design and technology companies are now helping medical device manufacturers to incorporate a similar look and feel...
  • Could Point-of-Care Devices Be the Next Killer Apps?

    Point-of-care (POC) devices based on microfluidic and system-on-a-chip technologies are highly regarded for their potential to remove many diagnostic procedures from the laboratory and place them directly into the hands of patients. In particular, by making some diagnostic devices as ubiquitous as consumer goods, such technologies could benefit patients in Third World countries, which lack the necessary infrastructure and professional staffs to monitor and improve patient health.As we point out...
  • Novel Carbon Supercapacitor Material Has Batterylike Energy Density

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) have helped to uncover the nanoscale structure of a novel form of carbon, contributing to an explanation of why this new material acts like a superabsorbent sponge that can soak up electric charge.Created by researchers at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin), the material can be incorporated into supercapacitor energy-storage devices with very high storage capacity while retaining other attractive...
  • Stimulating New Device Ideas to Treat Alzheimer's Disease

    Back in March, I blogged about a variety of light-based treatments for Alzheimer's disease that have shown promise for alleviating symptoms of the enigmatic brain disease. But this emerging R&D trend of exploring the potential of medical devices to treat Alzheimer's disease in light of dissatisfaction with current drugs is not confined to light-based treatments. Brain-stimulation devices, for example, are also being considered by researchers as a potential means of improving cognitive...
  • Grasping Molecular Nature of Glass Could Improve Biomaterials

    Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST; Gaithersburg, MD) and Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT) have used computer simulations to gain insights into a fundamental problem associated with glass-forming materials. These insights could aid manufacturers in the design and development of materials—including biomaterials.Designers of materials have long struggled to explain why many substances change from a watery state at elevated temperatures to a tarlike...
  • Genesis Plastics Welding Expands Medical Cleanroom

    Genesis Plastics Welding (Indianapolis), a provider of radio frequency (RF) plastics welding and RF heat-sealing services, has completed a $500,000 expansion of its Class 7 cleanroom. By doubling the size of its cleanroom, the company will be able to increase RF plastic welding and heat sealing of medical devices, supplies, and equipment.   The medical cleanroom initiative is one component of the company’s larger expansion strategy. Over the last year, the company has been gearing up for...
  • Energy-Harvesting Pacemaker Could be Eight Times Smaller than Conventional Designs

    CEA-Leti, a French research and technology organization, and several partners have announced that they are designing and developing an ultraminiature energy-harvesting cardiac pacemaker. Powered via harvesting mechanical energy from the movements of the heart, the pacemaker in development by the Heart-Beat Scavenger (HBS) Consortium is the latest device to take advantage of the slew of emerging technologies that power devices by harvesting everything from mechanical energy to thermal energy....
  • Scientists Develop Mega-Microchip for Medical Imaging Applications

    The DynAMITe microchip has been designed to enhance medical imaging of cancer tumors.A large microchip developed by scientists at the University of Lincoln (UK) is designed to enhance medical imaging applications. Measuring a whopping 12.8 cm square, the chip could eventually aid in the diagnosis of cancer, enabling doctors to see the impact of radiotherapy treatment more precisely. Dubbed 'DynAMITe,' the wafer-scale chip is 200 times larger than the chips currently driving PCs and laptops. The...
  • Can the Stethoscope Survive Alongside the Handheld Ultrasound?

    The Acuson P10 is the world's first pocket ultrasound.Back in March, the Wall Street Journal published an article on how mobile devices help improve treatment in which a San Diego-based cardiologist trumpets his decision to forsake his stethoscope in favor of GE's Vscan handheld portable ultrasound unit. "Why would I listen to 'lub dub' when I can see everything?" the cardiologist, Eric Topol, said to the paper. This brief comment has since sparked some fascinating debate as to whether the days...
  • Intel 3-D Transistors Headed for Mass Production

    Combining performance improvement and power reduction, Intel's Tri-Gate 3-D transistors could benefit many electronic products, including medical devices.Pulling out all the stops, Intel Corp. (Santa Clara, CA) is touting the entry of its 22-nm 3-D transistors into mass production as nothing short of revolutionary. Heralding this move as a first, the company says that the new transistors increase performance and reduce power consumption.Representing a fundamental departure from traditional 2-D...
  • Borate Glass Nanofiber Could Be Next-Generation Wound-Care Material

    Mo-Sci Corp. (Rolla, MO) has developed a novel wound-care material based on glass nanofibers that the company says can treat long-term wounds. While glass materials have already been used in such hard-tissue regeneration applications as bone repair, they have been based on silica. In contrast, Mo-Sci’s material, which has the consistency of cotton candy, is based on borate glass nanofibers.To develop a suitable borate-based wound-care material, Mo-Sci scientists Steve Jung and Delbert Day...