• Blood Clotting on a Chip

        A microfluidic device created at Harvard University's Wyss Institute successfully emulates the way the endothelium and circulating blood interacts. The Wyss Institute research group microengineered hollow channels with human endothelial cells chemically "fixed" along the lining of the channels.Accurately replicating this interaction in a device has proved challenging for a long time, according to the Wyss Institute. The research group at the institute was able to overcome...
  • Replicating Muscle and Nerve Connections on a Chip

        A microfluidic device created by MIT engineers has shown promise replicating the neuromuscular junction where nerve meets muscle. The device is roughly the size of a U.S. quarter and includes a single strip of muscle and a set of motor neurons. The neurons were genetically modified to respond to light. This meant the researchers could use light to stimulate particular neurons in precise ways, and then observe how the signals from particular neurons excited muscle fiber. The...
  • Lab-on-a-Chip: 7 Reasons You Should Care

        They could be replicating the connection between muscles or nerves, blood clotting, a lung, cancer, and much more. A host of recently announced microfluidic devices are recreating the human body on a chip, offering the hope of better understanding and diagnosis of disease. Here are seven recent breakthroughs that especially caught our eye:Continue >>How 3-D Printing Will Transform Medtech Find out how process innovations in 3-D printing are enabling next-generation...
  • Apple Buys Personal Health Records Startup

    The high-tech giant has acquired a startup that lets consumers put all their medical information in one place—but another sign of Apple’s growing interest in medical technology. Nancy CrottiApple has acquired a health record startup that allows consumers to gather, organize, and manage their own health information.Three-year-old Gliimpse (Redwood City, CA) helps consumers securely collect their lifelong medical data and that of family members from web portals, organize and share it. Apple...
  • These 3-D Printers Are Cool: So What to Call Them?

    “Multi-material, multiscale” 3-D printing doesn’t roll off the tongue. Help us pick a better name for the latest custom-built 3-D printers out of universities. Chris NewmarkerMcAlpine holds an LED 3-D printed onto curved glass with a custom-built 3-D printer. (Image courtesy of Frank Wojciechowski/Princeton University) The only name out there for it right now appears to be "multi-material, multiscale” 3-D printing. And Michael McAlpine at the University of Minnesota agrees it...
  • 13 Medtech Innovations to See at MD&M Minneapolis

    The 13 entries for the MD&M Minneapolis Innovation Prize are but a sampling of what one can see on the expo floor of the largest medical device manufacturing event in the Midwest.Dennis Engel and Chris NewmarkerFrom a vacuum-based decontamination mat to a super precise knife barrel hinge to mobile health–based breast cancer screening, there is a tremendous amount of wondrous variety among the 13 entries for the MD&M Minneapolis Innovation Prize.The entries are a testament to the value...
  • How to Persuade Doctors to Innovate

    Here’s a hint: It’s about data and information.Chris NewmarkerTom KraMer, president of Kablooe Design (Coon Rapids, MN), has years of experience when it comes to designing medical devices that health providers will actually want to use. It is one of the reasons his company is a frequent Medical Device Excellence Awards winner.(See KraMer and other experts discuss getting products into hospitals during MD&M Minneapolis, September 21–22 in Minneapolis)Qmed recently asked...
  • How to Get Doctors to Change Their Habits

  • Is This 3-D Printing's Future?

    It doesn’t have a snazzy name yet. But researchers at top universities have been making strides with custom-built 3-D printers that create with multiple materials from the nanoscale to the macroscale—enabling significant medical device innovation in the process.Chris NewmarkerResearchers led by Michael McAlpine at the University of Minnesota have custom-built 3-D printers that are able to create at micron-level details using multiple materials, including living cells. (Photo by Chris Newmarker/...
  • Medtronic Warns of a TAVI Implantation Problem

    The medical device giant has provided extra warning to doctors when it comes to the potentially deadly consequences of using too much force with the delivery system for the CoreValve Evolut R. Chris NewmarkerMedtronic has issued a worldwide warning to doctors to avoid using too much force while operating the Enveo R delivery system used with the CoreValve Evolut R transcatheter aortic valve implantation system. Dublin, Ireland–based Medtronic, which is run operationally...
  • How McDonald's Stumbled on Happy Meal Fitness Trackers

    The restaurant chain is pulling the activity bands over potential skin irritation problems. Chris NewmarkerMcDonald's apparently did not get what it bargained for when it made a foray into mobile health, temporarily packaging free activity tracking wristbands instead of just toys into its Happy Meals. The restaurant chain giant has announced that is voluntarily pulling the Step It! Activity Band from its Happy Meals in U.S. and Canadian restaurants, and going back to more traditional...
  • This PET Scanner Can Be Worn on Your Head

    The device allows scans of people in motion and requires a much smaller radiotracer dose.Nancy CrottiScientists at West Virginia University in Morgantown have developed what they say is the first wearable positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to study the brains of people while they’re in motion.The scanner, which makes the wearer look like a UFO landed on their head, eliminates the need for test subjects to remain perfectly still, according to a report in New Scientist.It also works...
  • New Tiny Implantable Devices Are Powered by Ultrasound

    New millimeter-sized "neural dust" devices use ultrasound for both wireless power and communication. Nancy CrottiResearchers have developed a wireless device small enough to be implanted in individual nerves, and capable of detecting the electrical activity of nerves and muscles deep within the body, according to DARPA, which funded the work.The millimeter-scale sensor and external ultrasonic transceiver that powers the implant and communicates with it is called a “neural dust” system. The team...
  • Are Olympians Embracing Dubious Medical Technology?

    Olympic athletes are always seeking to live up to the competition's motto "Citius, Altius, Fortius," Latin for "Faster, Higher, Stronger." Some of the medical technologies they use are head-scratchers, though. Qmed NewsTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), kinesiology tape, meditational headbands—those are but some of the medical technologies that Olympic athletes turn to (within the rules) to improve their performance. The proof behind such devices is all over the...
  • How to Avoid Ending Up Like Theranos

    A regulatory consultant explains how other medtech companies can avoid the problems that have beset the blood-testing startup.Nancy CrottiAny new medtech company could run into the problems that have troubled once-vaunted blood-testing company Theranos, according to regulatory consultant David Amor. Amor believes companies should know how to avoid them.The CEO of Minneapolis-based Medgineering originally gave a talk on the topic at the 10X Medical Device Conference in San Diego in May. Theranos...
  • Portable Device Produces Drugs on Demand

    MIT researchers have developed a novel system for manufacturing biopharmaceutical drugs on demand in resource-limited environments.  Kristopher Sturgis Researchers from MIT have developed a novel biopharmaceutical production system that can manufacture a variety of biopharmaceutical drugs on demand to provide treatment in resource-limited environments.The system was developed to produce a single dose of treatment from a portable, compact device containing a small droplet of cells in a...
  • Startup Gets $1.14 Million to Develop Artificial Pancreas Component

    The device, an advanced infusion set, combines continuous glucose monitoring and insulin infusion in a single form factor.Nancy CrottiPacific Diabetes Technologies's dual-function glucose sensing and insulin delivery system combines a sensing catheter, electronic sensor module, and insulin infusion line.A leading juvenile diabetes research organization has awarded an Oregon startup $1.14 million to help develop a novel treatment for Type 1 diabetes.The JDRF money will go to Pacific Diabetes...
  • Do Young Medtech Entrepreneurs Have It Easy?

    Is it easier for young people to have an impact on medical technology today than it was back in the day? Many of the industry’s rising stars say yes.Jamie HartfordKids these days, they have it so easy, right? Except, perhaps, when it comes to creating innovative medical technologies. Many in the industry bemoan the passing of the “good old days,” when funding for medtech ventures was easier to come by, regulations weren’t so stringent, and the bar for innovation wasn’t quite so high.Learn how...
  • Temporary Tattoo Detects Blood Alcohol Levels

    Researchers have developed a new flexible wearable sensor designed to stick to the skin and electrochemically monitor blood alcohol content in real time through sweat. Kristopher SturgisResearchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed a flexible, wearable sensor that can accurately measure blood alcohol levels from the user’s sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a smartphone or laptop. The sensor was designed to induce sweat levels under the patch and...
  • This New L'Oreal Patch Measures Sun Exposure

    Cosmetic giant L’Oreal launches skin patch to measure harmful rays—and it has an app, too.Nancy CrottiNot long ago, the catchphrase was, “There’s an app for that.” In healthcare these days, the new saying could well be, “There’s a patch for that.”Patches for smoking cessation and pain relief are old news. More recent introductions include patches that and monitor fevers and vital signs, while others that would fight obesity and diabetes are under development. Now, a skincare company has...