• How Gold Helps a Nanomaterial Kill Bacteria

    Depositing gold nanoparticles in titanium dioxide nanotube arrays may be just what is needed to boost bacteria-killing properties in some implants, according to research out of the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS).The Chinese researchers explained that although titanium dioxide is able to kill bacteria itself, its antimicrobial properties are dependent on a light source. When the metal is exposed to light, it becomes energetically excited by...
  • Goose Bump Detector Can Gauge Emotion

    A team of scientists at KAIST in Daejeon, South Korea, has developed a flexible, wearable polymer sensor that can directly measure the degree and occurrence of piloerection, commonly known as goose bumps, on the skin.They have published their work, “A Flexible Skin Piloerection Monitoring Sensor” (Kim, et al,) in the journal Applied Physics Letters. The Goose Bump Detector: a skin piloerection monitoring sensor (Courtesy Young-Ho Cho/KAIST)The researchers'  20 × 20 mm sensor...
  • Goose Bump Detector Can Gauge Emotion

  • 10 Really Cool Videos Related to Medtech

    From 3-D printed organs to a potential nanotech cancer cure developed by a teenager, MPMN has scoured the Internet to find 10 interesting medtech-related videos.1. All Your Devices Can Be Hacked—Including Your ICD and CarAvi Rubin, PhD, computer science professor at Johns Hopkins University explained how medical devices including pacemakers could be hacked during TEDxMidAtlantic last year.Read related Qmed article.2. 3-D Printing an EarLawrence Bonassar, PhD, associate professor of...
  • 3-D Bioprinted Networks Grow to Form Capillaries in Lab

    Researchers from the from the University of Sydney, Harvard, Stanford, and MIT have successfully bio-printed artificial vascular networks that mimic the body's circulatory system. These networks are necessary for growing large complex tissues and, eventually, organs.The breakthrough has been published in “Hydrogel Bioprinted Microchannel Networks for Vascularization of Tissue Engineering Constructs” in the journal Lab on a Chip.In an interview, lead author of the paper and University of Sydney...
  • Red Blood Cells Engineered to Deliver More Than Oxygen

    In research that may one day lead to a whole range of diagnostics and therapies, scientists at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have genetically and enzymatically modified red blood cells (RBCs) to carry a range of valuable payloads -- from drugs, to vaccines, to imaging agents – that can be transported throughout the circulatory system to a specific site in the body.In addition to being the most numerous cells in the body, mature RBCs have the distinction of lacking a nucleus...
  • Using Picosecond Lasers to Produce Disposable Ophthalmic Blades

    By Dirk MüllerMain Story:Miniaturized Cutting and Drilling Using Picosecond LasersVarious ophthalmic procedures, such as LASIK, require the use of an extremely precise cutting blade or scalpel. However, the cost of these applications is negatively impacted by an undesirable trade-off between blade sharpness and cost. While diamond blades can deliver the requisite sharpness, they cost up to $3000 per blade, precluding their use as disposables and thus requiring sterilization. Conversely, while...
  • GE Developing Smaller, Denser Next-Gen Neural Implants

    Jeff Ashe is a principal scientist at the biomedical electronics lab at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, NY, who is working on smaller, more biocompatible neural implants in the hope of advancing the state of the art.A scientist works in the cleanroom at GE Global Research in upstate NY. GE innovations in implants could benefit patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease as well as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and even depression. (Courtesy General Electric)Ashe, an electrical engineer, has...
  • Bio-bots Flex Their Muscles

    In 2012, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign created a walking biological robot powered by cells from the heart. The heart cells proved capable of generating movement in the small bio-bots (measuring less than a centimeter in height), but controlling the bot proved difficult as the cells are programmed to beat continuously. In addition, it was difficult to turn those robots on or off.To overcome those limitations, researchers at the same university have developed muscle...
  • Miniaturized Cutting and Drilling Using Picosecond Lasers

    Offering precision, high throughput, and cost savings, picosecond laser processing is suitable for fabricating microfluidic technologies, miniaturized implants, drug-delivery catheters, and other devices.By Dirk Müller, Coherent Inc.Sidebar:Using Picosecond Lasers to Produce Disposable Ophthalmic BladesTraditionally, electrical discharge machining (EDM) or conventional laser tools have been used to manufacture a range of precision medical devices. However, these manufacturing methods cannot be...
  • Top Trends in Stent Design and Manufacturing

    Qmed took to the show floor at the recent MD&M East event to discuss some of the top trends in stent design and manufacturing with industry experts from Memry, Norman Noble, and MeKo. Check out the below video to learn more about the continued move toward increasingly complex geometries and more exotic materials, as well as the challenges that these trends present.
  • How Flight Simulator Software Could Reboot Surgery

    They’ve had it in-flight simulators to help pilots train for life-or-death situations. Now 3-D and augmented reality is coming to another high stakes place—the operating room—after FDA clearance of Cleveland-based Surgical Theater’s Surgical Navigation Advanced Platform (SNAP).The technology from Surgical Theater was inspired by F-16 flight simulator software.The concept involves combining flight simulation technology with advanced CT/MRI imaging for use in brain surgery, according to Surgical...
  • Nanomachines Could Be on the Horizon

    The Rosetta macromolecular modeling package developed by the University of Washington's David Baker, PhD, and colleagues has formed the basis of a recently developed computational method that may be an important step toward the goal of constructing protein nanomachines engineered for specific applications—including in the medical device space. Computational model of a two-component protein nanocage with tetrahedral symmetry. (Courtesy Vikram Mulligan, PhD)In “Accurate Design of Co-...
  • Research Shows Hydrogels Help Stem Cells Repair Bone

    When stem cells are used to repair bone tissues, many of them wind up migrating away from the repair site. Now researchers at the University of Rochester in New York have developed a method of keeping them in place, resulting in faster and better tissue regeneration. Representation of hydrogel polymers (straight lines) trapping stem cells (light-colored figures) and water (blue). (Courtesy Michael Osadciw/University of Rochester)The technique, which is similar to that already used to...
  • An Exoskeleton First: FDA Clears ReWalk

    The ReWalk Personal System has become the first FDA-cleared wearable, motorized device to aid paraplegics—another first when it comes to what exoskeleton technology is enabling in the medical device field. The device was cleared via the de novo 510(k) classification process.ReWalk Personal SystemDeveloped by Argo Medical Technologies (Marlborough, MA), the ReWalk had already been on the market in Europe since 2012. The company has distribution partners in Great Britain, France, Italy,...
  • Why Designing Hardware with a Purpose Is Worth the Cost

    By Matt Dharm, JumpGen SystemsIt happened again: After screening multiple vendors, the computer hardware you’ve selected to use in your new medical device project is discontinued shortly thereafter. You’re left thinking: There has to be a more efficient, long-term solution to getting the components you need.Medical equipment manufacturers face unprecedented pressure in managing the supply-chain and fulfillment process. They must develop and commercialize innovative products faster at...
  • Bionic Vision Breakthrough Mimics Natural Eyesight

    A step along the road to the restoration of full-fidelity sight was achieved by a team of Stanford researchers who have used the electrical stimulation of retinal cells to produce the same patterns of activity that occur when the retina sees a moving object.                              Chichilnisky and colleagues used an electrode array to record...
  • Brain Chip Breakthrough Enables Paralyzed Man to Move Hand

    Using a brain chip smaller than a pea, a paralyzed man was able to move his arm. Ian Burkhart, a 23-year-old quadriplegic from Dublin, OH, was able to move a paralyzed hand—using only his thoughts thanks to a brain implant known as Neurobridge.The technology, developed by researchers at Ohio State University and the nonprofit research organization Battelle, is said to mark one of the first times that a chip implanted inside the brain of a paralyzed patient has allowed the patient to once again...
  • Nanobots Getting Tangled Up? The Octopus May Have an Answer

    In research that may one day find application in keeping nanobots from sticking to each other or tying themselves in knots, a study published in Current Biology details a Hebrew University of Jerusalem research team’s efforts to understand how octopuses avoid getting tangled up in their own long, flexible, suction cup-lined arms.Such research matters in the medical device space, because nanobots could be a medtech game-changer in coming years. (For example, Topol as chief academic...
  • 3-D Printing Creates Ultralight, Ultrastiff Nanoscale Geometry

    A high-precision 3-D printing process called projection microstereolithography has been employed by engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to construct microlattices with nanoscale features that combine great stiffness and strength with ultralow density.The new design, which may set new records for stiffness for a given weight, is called a stretch-dominated octet truss unit. The development is described in “Ultralight,...