• Is This New Weight Loss Device Scary? Seems So

    The AspireAssist—which drains ingested food from the stomach into the toilet—generated some strong opinions from Qmed’s medical device industry readers. Chris NewmarkerWhen asked what they thought of Aspire Bariatrics's AspireAssist weight loss device, recently approved by FDA, the majority of the 56 Qmed readers who responded agreed it was “scary.”An illustration of the AspireAssist in action. (Image courtesy of Aspire Bariatrics)The device includes a gastrostomy tube that is surgically...
  • What Telehealth Needs to Become Ubiquitous

    Telehealth could soon change healthcare forever, making medical care more accessible to more people, saving money and time in the process. But a few other major changes need to happen first, according to two prominent physicians.Nancy CrottiNew medical device tools are making it increasingly easy to remotely share vital signs with doctors. Shown here is Withings' wireless blood pressure monitor. (Image courtesy of Withings)Telehealth could soon become much more widespread than it...
  • These New Smart Threads Can Share Data

    Researchers from UC Berkeley have developed a technology that coats the threading of clothing with thermochromic paint that can change colors to represent data and information.Kristopher SturgisImagine a world where the shirt you’re wearing reflects your current mood, or the sweater you’re wearing relays real-time information about the weather. Researchers from UC Berkeley’s School of Information recently created a new technology that enables clothing threads to gradually change colors when...
  • How Chatty Robots Could Help Labor Ward Nurses

    An MIT-altered robot backed with AI provided scheduling recommendations to labor ward nurses at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. See how it turned out. Chris NewmarkerMIT researchers were recently able to demonstrate that the could train an altered Nao robot to learn the ins and outs of room scheduling in a labor ward at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Nurses accepted the robot’s recommendations 90% of the time. Just to make sure the nurses weren't blindly...
  • Is This Device a Better Way to Lose Weight?

    The new provocative device, known as the AspireAssist, is designed to provide patients who suffer from severe obesity with an alternative weight loss method—by draining ingested food from the stomach into the toilet.Kristopher Sturgis(function(t,e,o,n){var s,c,a;t.SMCX=t.SMCX||[],e.getElementById(n)||(s=e.getElementsByTagName(o),c=s[s.length-1],a=e.createElement(o),a.type="text/javascript",a.async=!0,a.id=n,a.src=["https:"===location.protocol?"https://":"http://","widget.surveymonkey.com/...
  • New Device Can Test Electric Field Cancer Therapies

    The new microfluidic device was designed to test the effects of electric fields on cancer cells, and identify which electric fields can keep malignant cells from spreading throughout the body.Kristopher SturgisThree of the credit-card-sized microfluidic devices are filled with food color dyes in this photo. The devices could aid scientists seeking to narrow in on safe electric field ranges for noninvasive treatment of breast, lung, and other forms of cancer. (Image courtesy of MIT)The...
  • DARPA Awards $7.5 Million for Implantable Biosensor Tech

    The grant will aid Profusa in further development of its implantable biosensors for continuous monitoring of multiple body chemistries.Qmed StaffProfusa (South San Francisco, CA) has won a $7.5 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the U.S. Army Research Office for further development of its tissue integrated biosensor technology, the company said Tuesday. The U.S. military sees value in the technology improving mission efficiency...
  • Artificial Placenta Offers Hope for Premature Babies

    The technology was created to mimic the placenta in the womb, and has the potential to improve survival rates in the most extreme cases of premature birth.Kristopher SturgisWhile only tried on lambs so far, the University of Michigan researchers think their artificial placenta could do away with the lung damage and potential brain bleeding associated with present ventilation techniques. (Image courtesy of University of Michigan)The new research comes out of the University of Michigan where...
  • How to Get a 3-D View Inside Cells

    Yale University researchers have invented a new way to view the tiny structures within cells in three dimensions. Their technology could provide a bevy of new information about the inner workings of cell structures.Kristopher SturgisThe microscope is able to take detected molecules (below) and resolve them into much clearer structures (above). (Image courtesy of Yale University)The Yale University–developed instrument provides researchers with the ability to image entire cells up to about 10...
  • This Sensor Can See in the Dark

    Biomimicry was key for the University of Wisconsin researchers designing the "artificial eye" sensor. Qmed StaffInstead of turning to infrared or boosting the sensitivity of the image sensor, the University of Wisconsin researchers took a hint from fish living in murky waters and focused on the optics, contributor RP Siegel explains in DesignNews. Professor Hongrui Jiang and his team figured out how to fabricate a highly precise array of tiny parabolic mirrors, placed on the...
  • What Do Medtech Users Really Want From IoT?

    Consider these five things to delight users and deliver meaningful value with connected devices, says Abbe Kopra of Insight Product Development.Abbe KopraAbbe Kopra (Image courtesy of Insight PD)IoT is a buzzword these days, and the opportunities for product development are extensive.McKinsey predicts “the impact of the Internet of Things on the global economy might be as high as $6.2 trillion by 2025," and leaders like Google, Cisco, Oracle, and Intel are banding together to support...
  • DIY Neurostimulation Can Be Really Dangerous

    Despite online plans and inexpensive materials, actual scientists say it’s a no-no.Nancy CrottiHandy folks who want the kind of jolt that caffeine can’t give have been turning to self-stimulation of the electrical sort—to their brains.Neuroscience researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard University are warning DIYers not to try this at home, or anywhere else. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) for enhanced brain function can have “unintended results,” according to...
  • Could Building a Heart Start With a Swimming Robot?

    Inspired by his daughter’s love of the aquarium, a researcher tests his heart-building ideas on a tiny robotic stingray powered by rat cells. Nancy CrottiA Harvard University professor wants build a human heart, so he made a “living” stingray robot first.The robot is the size of a nickel. It swims, guided by light and powered by rat heart muscle cells. It’s a step up from the robot jellyfish he made earlier, as the stingray can be maneuvered around obstacle courses with beams of light,...
  • Who Is the Most Innovative Exhibitor at MD&M Minneapolis?

    Compete for the MD&M Minneapolis Innovation Prize, which acknowledges the most innovative new products, services, and technologies developed by MD&M Minneapolis exhibitors. The deadline is August 19. Read on to find out how to enter. Qmed StaffUBM is looking to identify the most innovative exhibitors at MD&M Minneapolis and give them the recognition they deserve. The MD&M Minneapolis Innovation Prize is a contest acknowledging the most innovative products,...
  • MD&M Minneapolis Innovation Prize Official Rules

    NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT OF ANY KIND IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A PURCHASE OR PAYMENT WILL NOT IMPROVE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. CONTEST IS VALID ONLY IN THE UNITED STATES (EXCLUDING PUERTO RICO) AND CANADA (EXCLUDING QUEBEC) – ENTRIES FROM PERSONS LIVING IN OTHER COUNTRIES WILL BE AUTOMATICALLY DISQUALIFIED. GENERAL CONDITIONS:The MD&M Minneapolis Innovation Prize (the “Contest”) is sponsored by UBM LLC, 2901 28th St., Ste. 100, Santa Monica, CA 90405 (“UBM”...
  • How an Electromechanical Hug Could Prevent Heart Attacks

    Korean researchers make a wire wrap to stop rapid heart beat and restore cardiac electrical function.Nancy CrottiThe epicardial mesh was coupled to a rat heart (left). On the right are surface ECG (lead II) and intracardiac electrograms recorded from a conventional electrode on the RV and the epicardial mesh encircling the heart, with "p" as p-wave, "v" as ventricle, "a" as atrium. (Image courtesy of Institute for Basic Science)Cardiac pacemakers keep getting smaller, and now come in...
  • Why Is Innovation Hard at Big Medtech Companies?

    Large medical device companies seem to spend more of their billions acquiring the scrappy startups that do the hard work, versus real in-house innovation of their own, experts tell Qmed's sister media outlet MD+DI. We'd like to hear your opinions about the situation. Qmed StaffBig medical device companies seem more likely to acquire the smaller companies that have sweated through real innovation, versus doing it on their own, experts recently told Qmed's sister media outlet MD+DI. ...
  • Medtronic to Neurosurgeons: Read the Directions

    Improper handling of neuromodulation devices may have caused wire kinking, breaking.Nancy CrottiMedtronic's Activa PC is one of two neurostimulators using the affected DBS pocket adaptors. (Image courtesy of Medtronic)Medtronic has issued a global field safety alert for deep-brain-stimulation pocket adaptors after discovering broken wires in returned models.A company analysis of 16 DBS pocket adaptors that were returned for high impedance measurements identified “conductor wire fractures in...
  • Ease of Operation

        Home health care often requires patients to operate devices on their own when visiting nurses are not present (for some, that’s 24/7). The majority of these patients are elderly and unaccustomed to operating modern electronics. Therefore, the final device design—in addition to the considerations already mentioned—must also be intuitive to operate, both for the patient themselves and for any caregivers who do perform occasional house visits. 5 of the Most-Promising Smart...
  • Aesthetics

        Wearable devices introduce an added design challenge: patients want them to be attractive, unobtrusive or better yet, invisible. Insulin infusion devices are miniaturized and designed to be worn under clothing. Heart rate monitors are being sold by the millions and competing on the basis of fashion in addition to functionality and price. With the proliferation of home-use medical devices, it will be important to consider a device's physical attractiveness to consumers in...